Crtical Introduction

The Stranger by Albert Camus: A Critical Introduction
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Series: Crtical Introduction, Book 1. Price: $7.00 USD. Words: 67,050. Language: English. Published: March 10, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Education and Study Guides » Study guides - Literature
An in-depth analysis of this great novel for the student and the general reader. The book offers a clear and consistent interpretation of The Stranger.
The General Prologue by Geoffrey Chaucer: A Critical Introduction
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Series: Crtical Introduction, Book 2. Price: $7.00 USD. Words: 79,840. Language: English. Published: March 21, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Education and Study Guides » Study guides - Literature
The book is virtually unique in providing, in a single volume, a comprehensive analysis of The General Prologue. It places the work in the context of the social change in late fourteenth century England and analyzes each pilgrim’s description in socio-historical terms. The poem is supported by the author’s own modernization of the text to enable the reader to understand Chaucer’s Middle English.
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen: A Critical Introduction
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Series: Crtical Introduction, Book 3. Price: $7.00 USD. Words: 81,030. Language: American English. Published: July 15, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Education and Study Guides » Study guides - Literature
A critical introduction to "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen is suitable for students from high school up to university level as well as for the general reader. The book places the novel in the context of Austen's other works, analyzes the narrative voices, the manners of the times, marriage, and the importance of locations.
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Critical Introduction
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Series: Crtical Introduction, Book 4. Price: $7.00 USD. Words: 83,040. Language: English. Published: December 14, 2013. Category: Fiction » Literature » Literary criticism
This Critical Introduction explores the main themes, characters and symbols of "The Great Gatsby"; the quest for a new life, the preoccupation with one's place in society, the desire for riches and the greatest dream of all human beings. In doing so it offers an interpretation which, unlike most analyses of this American Masterpiece, places Nick as the focus of Fitzgerald’s attention.