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Strategy & Soul: a campaigner's tale of fighting billionaires, corrupt officials, and Philadelphia casinos
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Price: $14.99 USD. Words: 170,270. Language: English. Published: January 7, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Politics and Current Affairs » Activism
The movement was outspent by hundreds of millions of dollars, up against powerful elected officials, private investigators, and the state supreme court. This David versus Goliath story gives unparalled access to the behind-the-scenes of campaigns, making the nuances of strategy come to life. Written by an experienced and unusually self-reflective direct action organizer.
Lee Harvey Oswald’s Cold War: Why the Kennedy Assassination Should Be Reinvestigated
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Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 59,200. Language: English. Published: March 11, 2014 by MoshPit Publishing. Category: Nonfiction » True Crime » Assassinations and Conspiracies
The author examines the life of Lee Harvey Oswald in the context of the Cold War climate of the times and the people who shaped and used him. Includes the solving of a precedent case along with many new revelations in the Kennedy assassination itself. The ineluctable conclusion is that Oswald was the patsy he claimed to be.
Herman Melville’s Battle-Pieces Annotated by Lisa Shea
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Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 45,120. Language: English. Published: July 6, 2014. Category: Fiction » Poetry » Epic
While Herman Melville is best known for his epic novel Moby-Dick, in 1861 the American Civil War began. Melville had years of experience sailing on whaling ships and immediately went to enlist in the Navy. He was chagrined when he was turned down for health reasons. He would be forced to sit out this important war. So, instead, he turned to recording his thoughts on it in poetry.
The Day the Whistles Cried: The Great Cornfield Meet at Dutchman's Curve
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Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 55,140. Language: English. Published: December 30, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Transportation » Railroads / History
Two steam locomotives collide head-on in a cornfield at the edge of Nashville on July 9, 1918, taking the lives of more than a hundred people and injuring at least 300 others. This tragic tale, set against a backdrop of wartime urgency and human error, unfolds in the midst of the racial and societal divisions of the early twentieth century: a riveting story of decided historical impact.