Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Banks & banking

The Laundrymen - Inside Money Laundering, The World's Third Largest Business
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Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 123,690. Language: English. Published: May 2, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » True Crime » Drug trade
The world is awash with dirty money. Most of it comes from illicit drugs. Who's laundering it? Bankers, lawyers, accountants and money managers - from Wall Street to Main Street via Switzerland and the Caribbean. The Laundrymen gets to the root of the problem and, 20 years since it first became an international bestseller, remains the definitive book on money laundering.
The Sink - Crime, Terror and Dirty Money in the Offshore World
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Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 145,980. Language: English. Published: May 5, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » True Crime » Organized crime
The author of The Laundrymen and The Merger, Jeffrey Robinson, brings the story of dirty money full circle, back to the offshore islands in paradise where the business of crime does its banking.
The Little Website That Could
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Price: $10.00 USD. Words: 173,590. Language: English. Published: February 20, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Biography » Personal memoir
This is the book the National Australia Bank does not want you to read. Although written for an Australian audience, this book is a must read for all bank customers who believe their bank can be trusted. After losing at Summary Judgement, Rosie launched the ihatethenab.com website and so began her journey of discovery into the dark underbelly of Australian banking.
American Banking Through Crises and Consolidation: How Four Banks Bought 50% of America's Biggest Business
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Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 126,160. Language: English. Published: August 14, 2014 by SDP Publishing. Category: Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Banks & banking
Six weeks in the autumn of 2008 dramatically changed the direction and structure of American banking by taking size and consolidation to a new level that few fully yet understand. Like in all financial crises an inevitable result is the big banks get bigger and the number of banks fewer.