Nonfiction » History » Holocaust

Adventurers Against Their Will: Extraordinary World War II Stories of Survival, Escape, and Connection-Unlike Any Others
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Price: $6.99 USD. Words: 86,110. Language: English. Published: April 2, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Biography » Cultural heritage
2013 Global Ebook Award Winner: Nonfiction Biography Sorting through her parents belongings after their deaths, Joanie Holzer Schirm discovered an extraordinary lost world. Hand-written on faded and brittle stationary, stamped by censors, were 400 letters from 78 correspondents-along with carbon copies of the letters her Czech father had sent to them during World War II. An unforgettable story!
Never Be Afraid: A Belgian Jew in the French Resistance
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Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 110,050. Language: English. Published: December 7, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Biography » Historical biography
"Never Be Afraid: A Belgian Jew in the French Resistance" is the story of a Belgian Jew who flees to southern France with his family when the Nazis invade, poses as a Christian, and joins the French Resistance to fight Hitler’s Nazis. Bernard Mednicki's story, in the best tradition of the famous Yiddish writers, is a glorious refutation of the myth that the Jews went like "lambs to the slaughter."
Eye of the Eagle: The True Story of an American Hero
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Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 54,990. Language: English. Published: March 13, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » History » War
In World War II, most aviation pilots were armed with many weapons. But in the US Air Force reconnaissance squadron, these men flew ongoing missions over enemy lines, photographing enemy targets before and after they were bombed – facing onslaughts of enemy fighters and armed with -- a camera!
Genocide - A History from Carthage to Darfur
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Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 21,310. Language: Commonwealth English. Published: January 16, 2014 by RW Press. Category: Nonfiction » Social Science » Death & Dying
As Winston Churchill learned the full horror of the Nazi atrocities, he reportedly said, ‘This is a crime that has no name’. The sheer scale of the mass murder made a new expression necessary: this went beyond anything seen before or since. The term ‘genocide’ was coined by Raphael Lemkin, a Polish lawyer of Jewish descent, who lost most of his family in the Holocaust.