Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography

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TARDIS Eruditorum An Unofficial Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 3: Jon Pertwee
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Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 134,260. Language: English. Published: April 3, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Performing arts
A critical history of the Jon Pertwee era of Doctor Who, starting with Spearhead From Space in 1970 and ending with Planet of Spiders in 1974.
Billson Film Database: short reviews of over 4000 films
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Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 511,100. Language: English. Published: March 18, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Performing arts
(5.00 from 1 review)
Anne Billson has collected short reviews of over 4000 films into one ebook. You won't find reviews of every film ever made, or of the latest blockbuster, but you will have fun browsing (and perhaps disagreeing with) the personal and often unorthodox opinions of a widely published and respected film writer. Find out which films made her laugh, which made her cry, and which have cats in them!
Dancing Feat: One Man's Mission to Dance Like a Colombian
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Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 138,680. Language: English. Published: December 13, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Travel » Essays & Travelogues
Dancing Feat is the story of one Englishman's attempt to deal with his appalling dance ability – by dancing his way round Colombia. Join inveterate dance coward Neil Bennion as he romps through this land of swashbuckling peaks and luscious coastlines, learning new dances as he goes. When he’s not doing everything in his power to avoid them, that is.
Who Says That's Art? A Commonsense View of the Visual Arts
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Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 106,630. Language: English. Published: November 14, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Fine art
Today's artworld experts accept virtually anything as "art"—from an all-black painting to a facsimile of a supermarket carton or a dead animal preserved in a tank of formaldehyde. Many art lovers reject such work, arguing that it is not art. This book explains why they are right and the presumed experts are wrong.