Books tagged: coffee plantation

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Found 4 results

Aroma of Orange Pekoe - Non-fiction e-book
By
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 33,670. Language: English. Published: November 18, 2008. Category: Nonfiction » Biography » Autobiographies & Memoirs
The life and living; the entertaining and ways of Tea Planters who made a living in those remote plantations of north-east India in the 1950s. Scots, Brits, and Indians lived in a cohesive society mostly cut off from the rest of the world. They built their own clubs where they danced and entertained; played indoor and outdoor games; drank and lived a rugged life - hunting, fishing and trekking.
Serpents in the Sun
By
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 161,780. Language: English. Published: July 1, 2011 by Crossroad Press. Category: Fiction » Historical » General
The Bennett family moved to Jamaica after inheriting a coffee plantation in the Blue Mountains. This novel covers three generations of their lives, loves, triumphs and failures as the build an amazing, profitable plantation, producing some of the finest coffee in the world, and then run afoul of history.
Conquering Kilmarni
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 42,070. Language: English. Published: August 31, 2011 by Crossroad Press. Category: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Adventure
When Peter returns to his father's coffee plantation in Jamaica, he wants only to stay with his father. He has been lonesome since the year his mother and brother died; his grief-stricken father has been preoccupied and unable to see how much Peter wants to be at home. But an island boy, Zackie, is able to heal the rift between Peter and his father.
Cafè Zapatista: How to Support a Libertarian Society by Drinking Coffee
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 14,020. Language: English. Published: May 23, 2014. Category: Essay » Sociology
“The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) signed into legislation on Jan. 1, 1994 was to have ignited Mexico’s ascent into a modern, First-World State. But in the southern state of Chiapas on this New Years Day, an “armed uprising of indigenous peoples stole the media spotlight, exposing Mexico’s massive social inequalities and the exclusion of the country’s indigenous population.