Books tagged: curtis lemay

The adult filter is active; content marked as adults-only by the author is not listed. To view this content, click the button below to disable the adult filter.

Full Search

Found: 4 results

The Good-Bye Man
By Linda Brown
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 62,070. Language: English. Published: March 27, 2011. Category: Nonfiction
The clandestine career choices made by her father, Thomas Townsend Brown, and by the man who was her first love, would affect Linda Brown's life for years. Her memoir, THE GOOD-BYE MAN, offers an unusual perspective of the Cold War era from NICAP to General Curtis LeMay and the RAND Corp. It is her love song to her parents, and to some unusual companions, seen and unseen along the way.
True Life - The Soldier who Served Under Three Flags
By Brian Comerford
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 1,230. Language: English. Published: December 3, 2011. Category: Nonfiction
Clem Ryan, from Ireland, served in the Armed Forces of Ireland, Britain and the United States.He visited Hiroshima six months after the Atom Bomb. He provides a chilling first person account of that visit. He volunteered for service in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star for Meritorious Service. This is his story.
They Served Here: Thirty-Three Maxwell Men - Maxwell Air Force Base, Claire Chennault, Clark Gable, Glenn Miller, Henry Hugh Shelton, Hoyt Vandenberg, Curtis LeMay
By Progressive Management
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 14,980. Language: English. Published: June 27, 2012. Category: Nonfiction
Colonel Benton provides a glimpse of the history of Maxwell Air Force Base by highlighting the careers of 33 airmen who served at the base at some point in their military careers.
Great Commanders: Seven Leaders Who Changed the World - Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, Napoleon Bonaparte, Admiral Horatio Nelson, John Pershing, Erwin Rommel "The Desert Fox", Curtis LeMay
By Progressive Management
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 124,630. Language: English. Published: April 7, 2014. Category: Nonfiction
This volume begins with Alexander the Great, who wielded perhaps the finest army ever to wage war prior to the advent of gunpowder, and whose tactical and operational prowess bordered on genius.