Books tagged: david hume

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Found 4 results

Hume's Fork
By
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 100,710. Language: English. Published: November 18, 2009 by Bancroft Press. Category: Fiction » Literature » Literary
A comic drama about philosophy, family, religion, and, of course, professional wrestling. Barely adequate philosophy professor Legare Hume has a mind-body problem. No matter how far he goes, no matter how hard he thinks, he can’t escape the world he lives in. Hume’s Fork is a brilliantly satirical and philosophical novel, every bit as funny as it is intelligent—a true original.
An Introduction to Western Philosophy
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 12,840. Language: English. Published: March 20, 2011. Category: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Biography
Biographies and key ideas of twenty of the most important western philosophers, from Socrates, Plato and Aristotle to Nietzsche, Foucault and Derrida.
Reality and The Folly of Atheism: The Incompatibility of Truth and Anti-theism
By
Price: $11.99 USD. Words: 34,480. Language: English. Published: June 20, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » Religion and Spirituality » Christian Theology / Apologetics
Frequently summoned as justification for atheism and skepticism, modern science actually offers reasons for Christian theism. More than that, without the truth of Christianity, one could not even do science. Robinson challenges the dogmas of atheism, relativism and materialism as he demonstrates that only the existence of God explains reality, including: matter, order, science, design, and ethics.
An Essay concerning Human Enquiry: Exploring the Intersection of Hume and Kant — Perception, Causation and the Limits of Human Understanding
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 14,160. Language: English. Published: April 1, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Epistemology
Metaphysics is the search into existence, our existence within that existence, and our understanding of these existences. That is, how do we know what (or that) we know? This was a key question for Hume and Kant, and one which we shall consider. This essay, therefore, is a philosophical enquiry into human enquiry itself. We shall ask, how is it — and to what extent do — we understand our world?