Books tagged: elizabethan london

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Found 4 results

I Got Some Bad Muse For You
By
Price: $1.49 USD. Words: 19,470. Language: English. Published: July 8, 2011 by Banty Hen Publishing. Category: Fiction » Romance » Paranormal
Many artists wait for inspiration to strike. Few know that it does so with a clenched fist. Broke, drunk, and depressed, the young William Shakespeare has a bad case of writer’s block. The good news? His muse has arrived to inspire him. The bad news? She’s the muse of *boxing*. And she’s going to make Shakespeare the most famous playwright in England, even if it kills him.
Elizabethan Era
By
Price: Free! Words: 7,510. Language: English. Published: April 13, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » History » European
Elizabethan Era England Life: All major aspects of life in England during Elizabethan era. Includes biography of Elizabeth I, daily life of people, crime and punishment, theaters, plays, costumes, religion and famous Elizabethan era people including Shakespeare.
The Witchblade Chronicles Boxed Set (2 Historical Romance Novels)
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Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 190,420. Language: English. Published: February 8, 2013 by Oz Books. Category: Fiction » Romance » Historical
Historical paranormal romance like no other. Get both books in C.J. Archer's THE WITCHBLADE CHRONICLES in a single volume for one low price. Each book in this boxed set is available for purchase separately, but by buying them in this bundle, you're getting a better deal!
Mark Twain's 'Is Shakespeare Dead?'
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Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 9,240. Language: English. Published: July 4, 2014. Category: Plays » American / African American
Mark Twain's hilarious (1909) debunking of the myth that William Shakespeare wrote the works of Shakespeare, adapted as a monologue for the stage by Keir Cutler, PhD. Performed across North America since 2002. "Cutler humorously distills Twain's thesis that Shakespeare didn't actually write the great works attributed to him. It's a compelling argument . . . great comic effect." Orlando Sentinel