Books tagged: energy policy

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Found 4 results

Green Energy War
By
Price: Free! Words: 32,870. Language: English. Published: October 26, 2010. Category: Nonfiction » Politics and Current Affairs » Environmental politics
No drumbeat resonates like the mobilization of public opinion for war. In 2008 and 2009, policy elites around the world prepared for US re-entry to the global climate debate. These short narrative bursts capture the heady aspirations of the time, tracing the strategic perimeter of energy initiatives that soon turned comatose – a “weird and unintended prequel” to the exuberant 21 Machetes.
Japan's Tipping Point: Crucial Choices in the Post-Fukushima World
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 29,980. Language: English. Published: September 19, 2011. Category: Nonfiction » Travel » By region
JAPAN'S TIPPING POINT is a small book on a huge topic. In the post-Fukushima era, Japan is the "canary in the coal mine" for the world. Can Japan radically shift its energy policy, become greener, more self-sufficient, and avoid catastrophic impacts on the climate? Mark Pendergrast arrived in Japan exactly two months after the Fukushima meltdown. This book is his eye-opening account.
The Rape of Britain - Wind Farms and the Destruction of our Environment
By
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 3,290. Language: English. Published: September 28, 2011 by Bretwalda Books. Category: Nonfiction » Politics and Current Affairs » Environmental politics
Hard-hitting attack on the government’s windfarms policy, backed up by data and delivered in an engaging style.
THE Interview: Everyone Should Read This
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 5,060. Language: English. Published: January 30, 2012. Category: Essay » Political
Is it possible that for two generations the media, the American government, major political parties, and the entire civilized world has ignored a relatively simple solution to its energy needs? Seems hard to believe, doesn't it? And maybe we shouldn't believe the main idea presented in this article will work. But if it is viable, what an amazing difference it could make in the quality of life!