Books tagged: medical claims

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Found 4 results

How to Get a Raise from Managed Care Plans and Negotiate Your Contracts
By
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 12,000. Language: English. Published: June 13, 2010. Category: Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Insurance business
New, updated edition 2013! All medical and healthcare providers need to read this book! Your practice success depends on it. You will learn how Managed Care Plans covertly attempt to abuse you and how you can stop their unfair practices immediately. You’ll learn how to negotiate, how to investigate them, what to do when care is denied, how to appeal, how to get raises, tricky phrases to watch for.
Think Before You Swallow
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 67,000. Language: English. Published: January 4, 2011. Category: Nonfiction » Inspiration » General self-help
A seasoned health writer casts his skeptical eye over many of the 'facts' we've been encouraged to believe – from the dangers of cholesterol to the value of supplementary vitamins, from the benefits of exercise to the threat of epidemics. Laced with humour and leavened with fascinating minutiae, this is one of those rare health books that is both informative and entertaining.
Code Blues
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Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 102,050. Language: English. Published: August 15, 2011 by Olo Books. Category: Fiction » Mystery & detective » General
Dr. Hope Sze rolls into Montreal with three simple goals: 1) survive her family medicine residency, 2) try pain au chocolat, 3) go on a date sometime in the next two years. Then she discovers a doctor's body in the locker room. When she tries to uncover his killer, two men dive in to help her. The one man who makes her melt has zero alibi. "Hope Sze is an utterly likeable character.” EQMM
The One-Day New Body Makeover
By
Price: Free! Words: 36,840. Language: English. Published: January 22, 2012 by Banty Hen Publishing. Category: Nonfiction » Health, wellbeing, & medicine » Medicine
Much of what's written about cosmetic surgery in newspapers and magazines, and even in some medical journals, is half-truth, myth, or advertising. The media has distorted public perception with overly negative or sensationalized stories, and medical specialty organizations contribute to the mayhem by promoting warring viewpoints to establish their own market share.