Books tagged: natives

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Found 14 results

The Tonga Book — February 1805 – June 1811
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 180,400. Language: English. Published: July 20, 2011. Categories: Nonfiction » History » World, Nonfiction » History » Civilization
The remarkable adventures of young William Mariner on a voyage around the world and his long sojourn in the islands of Tonga wherein he gives us a full account of the inhabitants of those islands and the conduct of their lives.
An Enlightening Lie About the Lucidity of Bees
Price: $2.50 USD. Words: 60,270. Language: English. Published: January 18, 2011. Categories: Fiction » Religious, Fiction » Visionary & metaphysical
Crofton Eer, a member of a militaristic society set in a canyon that knows only war, seeks an escape from the troubled canyon in which he lives, guided by the embodiment of the lone star that is visible from the canyon depths. His escape takes him on a journey in which he discovers that there are a great many more stars (gods) in the sky, which leads to a search for truth in the valley of life.
The AJC Reporter
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 1,000. Language: English. Published: September 2, 2010. Categories: Nonfiction » History » American
An Atlanta newspaper reporter, looking for a story, reveals the secret history of the smallest county in Georgia. Facts unleashed, the resident natives become suspicious of one another and the origins of the old-name families.
Crossing the Water: The Alaska-Hawaii Trilogies
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 43,130. Language: English. Published: July 26, 2009 by Pleasure Boat Studio. Categories: Fiction » Literature » Plays & Screenplays
These are not “touristy” stories. They are deep and hard, a reflection of the regions in which they’re set. In the Alaska segment, Warner focuses on the passions that isolation and weather can bring out in human beings. In his “Hawaiian Island Trilogy,” he looks at a different kind of mythos – the often ethereal dimension of time.