Books tagged: origin of religion

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Found 4 results

Religion, Language, Narrative and the Search for Meaning
By
Price: Free! Words: 56,640. Language: English. Published: October 29, 2009. Category: Nonfiction » Religion and Spirituality » Atheism/Agnosticism
This is a book about religion from a secular standpoint which nevertheless takes its subject seriously. Contrary to some secularists I don't think religion is likely to disappear any time soon. I try to develop a way of thinking about religion, using two main clues: language and narrative. Narrative is how most religious people encounter their religions, because humans are story-telling animals.
Medicine Traveler
By
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 59,860. Language: English. Published: August 10, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » Health, wellbeing, & medicine » Alternative medicine
This book is an introduction of Siberian medicine, theory and technology. This is the personal experience of one medicine traveler and his memories.
Origins: Colliding Causalities
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 25,490. Language: English. Published: November 21, 2012. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » Hard sci-fi
Science fiction, fantasy, and horror anthology, "Origins: Colliding Causalities," considers the origins of such far-flung topics as cosmology, unending war, sexual mores, and even humanness. Using satirical, speculative, or anthropological viewpoints, these imaginative tales propose new answers to the questions many have asked: "Where the hell did *that* come from?"
The Righteously Mimetic Mind
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 11,920. Language: English. Published: June 6, 2014. Category: Essay » Political
This essay connects the dots between “The Righteous Mind”, the recent success of Jonathan Haidt about the evolutionary foundations of morality and mimetic theory developed by Rene Girard around the key concepts of imitative desire and scapegoating. To my knowledge, the two theories are the best tools available today to interpret human moral and political behavior.