Books tagged: sichuan

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Found 4 results

Introduction to China's Industrial Parks
By
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 1,220. Language: English. Published: May 24, 2010. Category: Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Business finance
China’s rapid economic growth has attracted the attention of foreign investors all over the world, and the flow of foreign investment into China has had much to do with the country’s establishment of development zones and industrial parks.
Overview of China's Economy
By
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 7,400. Language: English. Published: May 25, 2010. Category: Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Business finance
The reform that started in late 1978 has turned China into the fastest growing major economy in the world. In 2008, China’s GDP grew 9.0% and reached RMB 30.1 trillion (US$4.4 trillion ). In the same year, China’s economy was the third-largest economy in the world, 20% larger than Germany’s. China is expected to replace Japan as the world’s second-largest economy in 2010.
Industrial Parks in Sichuan
By
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 4,420. Language: English. Published: June 30, 2010. Category: Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Business finance
Chengdu is situated on the western edge of the Sichuan Basin. The climate is mild and humid. Rainfall is reliable year round but peaks in summer. As a result of its strategic geographic location, Chengdu acts as the gateway to the southwestern region. This city is also the economic, commercial, financial, transportation and communication center of Southwest China.
China's Ancient Tea Horse Road
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Price: $7.99 USD. Words: 10,640. Language: English. Published: July 19, 2011. Category: Nonfiction » Travel » By region
The antique Silk Road that connected the Chinese and Mediterranean Worlds for more than a millennium, facilitating the exchange of both goods and cultures, is widely known and celebrated. Less familiar is its more southerly equivalent, the ‘Ancient Tea-Horse Road’ that once linked the lush gardens of southwest China with the frigid wastelands of Tibet and the torrid plains of northern India.