Fatal Catch

Rated 4.00/5 based on 1 reviews
It's 1963, and Chief Riley Bennett knocks on Dody Canfield's door informing her that her husband died instantly when his car struck a telephone pole. Not wanting to raise her three children alone, it isn't long before she brings home Frank Billings; and he's moving in.

Mama sends thirteen-year-old Missy to take her little brother, Billie, fishing so she can have some alone time with Uncle Frank.

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Words: 62,470
Language: English
About Roxe Anne

Roxe Anne Peacock's first mystery, Leave No Trace was released by Whiskey Creek Press February 15, 2011. It is suitable for older teens and adults. Fatal Catch was released by Roxe Anne Peacock on November 1, 2011 and is also suitable for older teens and adults. Fatal Catch is set in the 1960's and will bring those of you born in the 1950's back to your childhood. A short story, Battlefield Ghosts will appear in the magazine, Ghost Voices--a division of Dragoon Publishing at the end of November 2011, issue #18. Currently, Roxe Anne is working on another mystery entitled, Catch and Release and is set in Hayward, Wisconsin. She is also working on a historical cookbook project, History Lover's Cookbook. The cookbook is based on 19th century recipes and the Civil War. She hopes to have both projects completed in 2012. Her dog, Spike helps her work on every project. Roxe Anne has five daughters, four son-in-laws, five grandchildren and lives with her husband, Tom.

Reviews

Review by: Carl Brookins on Aug. 11, 2012 :
In 1963, a ten—year-old girl named Missy Canfield, the narrator of this interesting tale, is confronted by one of the worst calamities imaginable. Her beloved father, Daniel, has been killed in an automobile crash. She is living in a small community somewhere in the central part of the United States. It doesn’t matter exactly where. It is universal small town America and the family is solidly rooted in all that implies, including a very marginal income. The children wear hand-me-downs, Missy’s surviving parent is a woman of questionable moral virtues, yet she works hard, clearly loves her children and struggles to meet her obligations to her family.

Wise beyond her years, readers will quickly become enamored of this child and her siblings. Her observations of the parade of “uncles” who take up temporary residence in the family, her “take” on ordinary family gatherings, by turns trenchant and naïve, propel the story forward in a way that almost requires we continue to read. A sense of foreboding permeates the atmosphere almost from the very first page and that foreboding grows.

Yes, there is murder, yes there is domestic violence, and menace toward the children and yet through adroit maneuvering there is a sense that the family will persevere. This novel is amazingly middle American in almost every sense. For all its occasional shifty flaws, the narrator is so endearing most readers will come away saying, she got it right. That’s really the way it was in those times. That’s who we were. There is not much more a writer can ask.
(reviewed long after purchase)

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