Orphan Records

Rated 5.00/5 based on 1 reviews
Future post Global Warming and resource wars produce survivors that get organized using computer power to isolate, to dominate. Political power requires cyberspace control. Be there when the gamers of the world unite to defend freedom from those that wish to corner and control. Watch savvy clones level the playing field in a great cyber war.

Available formats: epub, mobi, lrf, pdb

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Words: 79,610
Language: English
ISBN: 9780741430526
About John Wolf

John Wolf, author of “Orphan Records”, “A Dark and Stormy Knight”, “Harmonics”, “Of Beryl & Alabaster” and "Benny Plays the Blues." Also, a mess of short stories.

I've been a hack musician most of my life. I spent 13 years as a navigator in the Air Force, pursued a profession as an engineer, and retired to writing action stories and mysteries. All of these things, plus the odd environment of growing up in New Mexico has given me a joyful perch from which to look out onto life.

I was a songwriter for several years, but found being lost in the constructs of writing a novel more fulfilling. The songs were just short stories, my short stories vignettes of ideas, the novels a real sense of being out there riding the waves.

John writes from his home in San Diego, California.

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Reviews

Review by: Donna Jaske on April 19, 2010 :
Some books are just made for certain readers. This is a great book for those who love action-packed adventure. The bonus is that it also has something for computer game players because the game players in this story, on a world level, find their game somehow becomes the real world.
I like how the opening pages very succinctly summarize the two world nuclear wars that essentially destroyed civilization, but they don’t waste time on the details of the horrors of the wars. We all know about that:
Hatred lit the sky with fire in the Holy Lands of the Middle East. It is still not clear who launched the first volley, but the debates over who owned what religious relics ceased. They no longer existed.

Andy, in the new world, is caught gaming at work:
A particularly gloomy supervisor pointed out that gaming was not for responsible vanguards of the (new) nation’s record-keeping complex. “Break time is over Andy,” he said in a dull voice. “You’ll never save the world with those silly games.”

He could never have been more wrong. Let the games begin.
I like the book cover and the tie-in of the title to the orphan records found in the vast computer system.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

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