Big Enough: A collection of stories

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A collection of short stories including: Big Enough, Man of Iron, Kataki, Line Rider, The Kid and the Commodore, Death of a Hunter, Requiem for a Pig, and A Father's Prayer plus 2 Bonus Features.
"This collection is a real treat for fans of Charlie's (Chuck Tyrell) work, and if you're a first timer, then you're about to discover a fine guy and a fine author..." - C. Courtney Joyner More

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Published by Western Trail Blazer
Published: Jan. 27, 2012
Words: 32,890
Language: English
ISBN: 9781465912411
About Chuck Tyrell

Chuck Tyrell is the pen name for Charles T. Whipple, an international prize-winning author. Whipple was born and reared in Arizona’s White Mountain country only 19 miles from Fort Apache.
He won his first writing award while in high school, and has won several since.

Raised on a ranch, Chuck brings his own experience into play when writing about the hardy people of 19th Century Arizona. Although he currently lives in Japan, he maintains close ties with the West through family, relatives, former schoolmates, and readers of his western fiction.

Whipple belongs to Western Fictioneers, Western Writers of America, Arizona Authors Association, American Society of Journalists and Authors, and Tauranga Writers Inc.

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Reviews

Review by: lfsims on Sep. 16, 2012 : star star star star star
I loved Big Enough, the other stories were good too but out of all of them that is the story that stuck with me after I read the whole book. So it is a book about short stories but the author has made all of them terrific. All of them are great westerns.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Cane Hollow Press on March 25, 2012 : star star star star star
Chuck Tyrell has been writing for a long time- and in the last few years people have started to find his work. In short order, he is becoming regarded as one of the brightest "new" western authors. In this collection, you can find out why. His characters come alive- whether they are cowboys, young girls, or vengeful samurai. As an added treat, there is an excerpt from his acclaimed novel VULTURE GOLD. If you like westerns, you need to check this out.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Ron Scheer on Feb. 24, 2012 : star star star star star
Western writer Chuck Tyrell has a new collection of stories--mostly fiction, some nonfiction. They are an entertaining mix of genres, ranging from traditional and historical westerns to noir and memoir, plus excerpts from two novels. If you've read about the Old West and Charles' home state, Arizona, you quickly sense the historical grounding of his stories, and you know you're in good hands. Compared to the writing of those who know the West only from other western novels and the movies, he gives you two or three more layers of detail. You might call it "high definition."

The title story is about a horse and the young rider patiently gentling it, until strangers arrive who happen to be a step or two ahead of the law. Tyrell's men may be good with a gun, but they prove their mettle in other ways, too. In "Man of Iron," the narrator discovers that he has shot an Apache woman with a newborn child. Never mind that she's tried to kill him herself. He makes a superhuman effort to return her to her tribe. A Japanese man schooled in centuries-old martial arts has come West to avenge the death of his father in "Kataki." He finds his way into the fiercely defended stronghold of a desperado in Mexico and doesn't need a gun at all.

Meanwhile, Tyrell has a special way with lawmen. They step off the page with well-defined features and temperament. In "The Kid and the Commodore," the historic lawman Commodore Perry Owens offers an absorbing portrayal of the man who played a key role in the Pleasant Valley range war during the 1880s in Arizona. Tyrell's Marshal Havelock, notably in the collection's excerpt from the novel VULTURE GOLD, is a clear-thinking man of action. He gets the job done, even with the help of those who question his authority because of his mixed race. Just watch how he calmly manages a posse while in pursuit of two robbers of gold bullion. Excellent reading, not just for the western fan.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Ron Scheer on Feb. 24, 2012 : (no rating)
Western writer Chuck Tyrell has a new collection of stories--mostly fiction, some nonfiction. They are an entertaining mix of genres, ranging from traditional and historical westerns to noir and memoir, plus excerpts from two novels. If you've read about the Old West and Charles' home state, Arizona, you quickly sense the historical grounding of his stories, and you know you're in good hands. Compared to the writing of those who know the West only from other western novels and the movies, he gives you two or three more layers of detail. You might call it "high definition."

The title story is about a horse and the young rider patiently gentling it, until strangers arrive who happen to be a step or two ahead of the law. Tyrell's men may be good with a gun, but they prove their mettle in other ways, too. In "Man of Iron," the narrator discovers that he has shot an Apache woman with a newborn child. Never mind that she's tried to kill him herself. He makes a superhuman effort to return her to her tribe. A Japanese man schooled in centuries-old martial arts has come West to avenge the death of his father in "Kataki." He finds his way into the fiercely defended stronghold of a desperado in Mexico and doesn't need a gun at all.

Meanwhile, Tyrell has a special way with lawmen. They step off the page with well-defined features and temperament. In "The Kid and the Commodore," the historic lawman Commodore Perry Owens offers an absorbing portrayal of the man who played a key role in the Pleasant Valley range war during the 1880s in Arizona. Tyrell's Marshal Havelock, notably in the collection's excerpt from the novel VULTURE GOLD, is a clear-thinking man of action. He gets the job done, even with the help of those who question his authority because of his mixed race. Just watch how he calmly manages a posse while in pursuit of two robbers of gold bullion. Excellent reading, not just for the western fan.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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