The Evolution of Human Intellect --- Discover the Information that Schools and Religions Aren’t Yet Teaching

Rated 2.67/5 based on 10 reviews
Why did women lose their facial hair during evolution? Where did the notion of god(s) come from? Why did self-awareness arise in the torso before migrating behind the eyes? What transition sparked the feud between science and religion? All of these questions have simple and logical answers, which are entertainingly revealed in the form of two amusement park attractions.

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Words: 17,980
Language: English
ISBN: 9781465944559
About L.N. Smith (Bert)

In this world of credentialed experts, the author, L.N. Smith, is not one of them. In fact, his credentials are so unconvincing that he has chosen to publish under a humorous pen name instead of his real name. "L.N. Smith" is actually the abbreviation for a phrase that sets up a joke. (The clues to the full name are in Sunrise Over Disney.) Only time will tell if the joke is on him or on today's "credentialed experts."

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Reviews

Review by: sri s pande on Feb. 07, 2013 :
I actually received a free electronic copy of this book some time ago. Only now, I could have written a review about it. I would love to have copies of his other book. It's fresh and interesting.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Angie Lisle on Feb. 03, 2013 :
Immediately, we learn that this book is parts of two other books that have been cut and squished together. The premise of the book -to discuss the evolution of human intelligence- is convoluted within an account of a Disney-like theme ride. I found this to be a frustrating read.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Brittany Webb on Feb. 01, 2013 :
I received a free electronic copy of this book. I was expecting a longer book written in a more scientific tone. On the contrary, this was 84 pages long and told in the setting of a Disney ride.

I did not find any deep insight into the world but the author's ideas are fresh and interesting. I would read more of this author's work.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Maura Trocan on Jan. 27, 2013 :
I found this book by signing into a giveaway contest from goodreads. I haven't won the paperback book, but I am glad the author contacted me, with the offer of a free ebook version.

I found this book really interesting, it sure caught my mind. At first, I started to read it out of curiosity, but I am glad I did. The ebook is short, 72 pages, but I soon reached the conclusion that if it was longer, as I first expected it to be, it would be too long and it would make people lost their interest.
I didn't enjoy reading the first chapters, but I kept reading on because I was curious how it would evolve. I am glad I did, because from chapter 3, I started to enjoy it and I was finally able to follow the train of thought.
One funny thing is that the story of human thinking put my brain to think about this subject, and engage into discussions with some of my friends.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Steven Woller on Dec. 18, 2012 :
This book has a lot of interesting thoughts almost smothered by an often preachy feeling story of a journey. The content is stimulating and eventually becomes engaging but it takes a lot of dedication on the part of the reader to get past the troublesome first chapter and then settle into the ride. It wasn't till near the end that I felt the desire to continue.
At the end I felt a little let down by the complete lack of concrete information. The metaphorical bridges and tour guide's explanations were too flossy and seemed only to brush the surface of what could have been explored. I would have liked something a bit more hard hitting and academic from a book that claims to teach you what "schools and religions" don't.
I'm left with the feeling that the author has not got out all the information they wanted in as educative a way as they desired. There is more, one hopes, to Smith's understanding of this subject than is in this book.

I also recieved this from the author after signing up to win it in a giveaway.
Thanks to the author for allowing me to read it.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Sarah Frost on Nov. 18, 2012 :
I signed up to win this book in a GR giveaway, I didn't win the 'real' book, but the author contacted me with the offer of a free ebook version via Smashwords in return for a review. This has not impacted my ability to review it honestly and critically.

11/11 - The ebook is very short, only 72 pages and I'm at the half way point. I have just stopped reading for the night and since I already had my laptop out in order to read the ebook (I don't have an ereader, so I use Adobe Digital Editions on my laptop) I decided to write the first part of my review now while the thoughts are fresh in my mind, instead of waiting till tomorrow morning. I was drawn in by the premise and the title. To start with I have no idea what chapter 1 was all about, it made no sense to me at all and all I could think as I was reading it "Oh oh, this looks like it's going to be my second only 1 star review and my first bad review for a book straight from the author." After I managed to wade through the crap that was the first chapter my interest was re-engaged by the theories Smith posits. For example his idea of when and why females lost their facial hair - to make facial expressions easier to read and give us the ability to use more sophisticated ones. I would be very interested to know where he got his information from, what proof he has of this theory. It's funny to see his one and only character's name is Sarah, but I don't understand what she's doing there or why we're on a simulated roller coaster ride. I think the information in the book (if it's true) would be interesting enough without all the gimmicks that Smith's added. To be continued...

14/11 - While I found the information about evolution in this book very interesting and thought provoking, I didn't enjoy all the silliness of the Disney ride metaphor or the description of a film presentation that makes up the first chapter. After reading the first part of my review, the author contacted me to explain a few of the things I had problems with. He reiterated that chapter 1 is an excerpt from one of his other books (this fact is included at the very top of the first page) while the rest of the chapters are from another of his other books. This didn't really explain to me why Smith would include this completely unneccessary portion of another book, it didn't add anything to the rest of the story, in fact I nearly gave up on the whole book halfway through reading the first chapter. The second part of my review that he brought up was the fact that I mentioned wondering what his sources were - he reassured me that he did have some and would be happy to send me a copy of the bibliography, which is included in one of the books that he took the majority of his information from. My question to him was why not include it in this book as well? A lot of the readers of this book will not have contact with Smith and so won't know, or find out, that to read the bibliography you need to buy another of his books because it's in there. And how many readers are going to be willing to buy a book simply to get the chance to read a bibliography that refers to a book they already have? Certainly not me. In the introduction that advises you of the fact that this book is comprised of two of his previous books, he also mentions the reason he has published the book in this way is that some readers have preferred reading it in this abbreviated way. I personally would rather have read the book that made up the interesting chapters, that is chapters 2-15, and forget chapter 1 entirely, and that is what I recommend to other readers interested in the information over the gimmicks.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Sarah Frost on Nov. 18, 2012 :
I signed up to win this book in a GR giveaway, I didn't win the 'real' book, but the author contacted me with the offer of a free ebook version via Smashwords in return for a review. This has not impacted my ability to review it honestly and critically.

11/11 - The ebook is very short, only 72 pages and I'm at the half way point. I have just stopped reading for the night and since I already had my laptop out in order to read the ebook (I don't have an ereader, so I use Adobe Digital Editions on my laptop) I decided to write the first part of my review now while the thoughts are fresh in my mind, instead of waiting till tomorrow morning. I was drawn in by the premise and the title. To start with I have no idea what chapter 1 was all about, it made no sense to me at all and all I could think as I was reading it "Oh oh, this looks like it's going to be my second only 1 star review and my first bad review for a book straight from the author." After I managed to wade through the crap that was the first chapter my interest was re-engaged by the theories Smith posits. For example his idea of when and why females lost their facial hair - to make facial expressions easier to read and give us the ability to use more sophisticated ones. I would be very interested to know where he got his information from, what proof he has of this theory. It's funny to see his one and only character's name is Sarah, but I don't understand what she's doing there or why we're on a simulated roller coaster ride. I think the information in the book (if it's true) would be interesting enough without all the gimmicks that Smith's added. To be continued...

14/11 - While I found the information about evolution in this book very interesting and thought provoking, I didn't enjoy all the silliness of the Disney ride metaphor or the description of a film presentation that makes up the first chapter. After reading the first part of my review, the author contacted me to explain a few of the things I had problems with. He reiterated that chapter 1 is an excerpt from one of his other books (this fact is included at the very top of the first page) while the rest of the chapters are from another of his other books. This didn't really explain to me why Smith would include this completely unneccessary portion of another book, it didn't add anything to the rest of the story, in fact I nearly gave up on the whole book halfway through reading the first chapter. The second part of my review that he brought up was the fact that I mentioned wondering what his sources were - he reassured me that he did have some and would be happy to send me a copy of the bibliography, which is included in one of the books that he took the majority of his information from. My question to him was why not include it in this book as well? A lot of the readers of this book will not have contact with Smith and so won't know, or find out, that to read the bibliography you need to buy another of his books because it's in there. And how many readers are going to be willing to buy a book simply to get the chance to read a bibliography that refers to a book they already have? Certainly not me. In the introduction that advises you of the fact that this book is comprised of two of his previous books, he also mentions the reason he has published the book in this way is that some readers have preferred reading it in this abbreviated way. I personally would rather have read the book that made up the interesting chapters, that is chapters 2-15, and forget chapter 1 entirely, and that is what I recommend to other readers interested in the information over the gimmicks.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Xx Yy on June 18, 2012 :
I, like many others, had a really hard time getting into the book. I had to convince myself to keep reading and finally after a couple of chapters I was able to follow the train of thought. There were some interesting points that the author made, but many are simply age-old discussions.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Xx Yy on June 18, 2012 : (no rating)
I, like many others, had a really hard time getting into the book. I had to convince myself to keep reading and finally after a couple of chapters I was able to follow the train of thought. There were some interesting points that the author made, but many are simply age-old discussions.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Annika Ennok on June 08, 2012 :
When I started this book, it made me think "Did I really want to read a weird book of movie scenes, what is the point in it?". But from somewhere from chapter 3-4 it started to make sense. In the end even the weird starting made sense, it all found its place.
It is a story about the evolution of human thinking - how it has changed during the history, when and how, and how it has influenced our future. And it is all wrapped inside of a science fiction story. (And I love SciFi.)
It was quite interesting and I must say thanks to the author of the book, who gave it to me. It was good reading in the end, even if I disagreed with this in the middle of the book. :)
My realization is now:
Do not judge a book by its first chapters!
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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