Flight 1401 A Science Fiction Anthology

Rated 4.50/5 based on 2 reviews
Near future science fiction: a lone youth is faced with deadly danger in a post-apocalyptic wasteland; a child finds a cache of century-old 'buried treasure'; a dying father reveals a secret world to his son; on a plane trip from NY to London, a young man's computer tablet is more capable than he anticipated; and the pressure to find new sources of fossil fuels leads to an ominous discovery. More

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Words: 14,020
Language: English
ISBN: 9781476321325
About Peter Salisbury

I studied Chemistry at university and then spent over thirty years in classrooms across England teaching almost anything but Chemistry, including Photography, Communications Skills, General Science, Computing, and Information and Communications Technology.

In the 1990s I spent ten years writing abstracts of chemical patents. These were distributed to research scientists by subscription. Articles of mine have been published in magazines and I have written assignments used for assessing Communications Skills for a major international Examination Board. About twelve years ago I began writing science fiction.

What next? Complete the fourth novel-length book in the SF series following on from 'Passengers to Sentience', 'Passengers to Zeta Nine' and 'Passengers: Revelations'.

The profile picture is a portrait of the author as a young man, painted by Charlotte Salisbury, the cover artist for 'The Old Store'.

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Reviews

Review by: Adero C E Allison, PHD on May 15, 2012 :
This is a good anthology. Each story held my attention. I am more of a novel person so I frequently wanted more but I never felt that there was something missing as I finished a story.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Daphne Coleridge on April 16, 2012 :
Five clever and inventive stories which were fun to read. My favourite was “In My Own Hands”, which provides a surprisingly convincing explanation for the pace of development in computer science. The author uses his very fertile imagination and his scientific knowledge to explore some quirky twists to ideas old and new; including man’s first encounter with alien technology and the unexpected potential of a boy's tablet. A quick read, but with enough new ideas in it to keep me thinking.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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