El Aguila

Rated 5.00/5 based on 2 reviews
The cafeteros in Colombia get forced into growing coca after the bottom drops out of the coffee market. The guerrillas get involved and then all hell breaks loose when the military gets wind of it and tries to force them out. It is told from the eyes of a nineteen-year-old girl who hires a coyote to bring her across the Arizona border after her entire town and family are decimated by bloodshed. More

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Words: 42,270
Language: English
ISBN: 9781452488615
About James M. Weil

James Weil is an award-winning writer who has written for newspapers, magazines, and scientific journals. Fresh out of high school, he was accepted into Antioch’s Summer Seminar for Writers at Oxford, England. From there he attended Antioch’s Writer’s Year Abroad in London.

Taking a two-year hiatus from school, he moved to Padua, Italy where he made a living working odd jobs and tutoring English to medical students at the University of Padua. During his two-year stay in Italy, he traveled extensively throughout the country, and speaks several dialects of Italian.
He received his B.A. in Journalism from Temple University with a minor in business. After several years working for next to nothing in newspapers and magazines, he decided to go into the business end of publishing and found a job in circulation management with a controlled-circulation magazine publisher in Westchester, NY.

The company was years behind the times, and their fulfillment house was sending their circulation files on microfiche. Realizing quickly that this would never do, he researched database software that would fit the needs of the company.

Visual FoxPro 3.0 was the hottest database programming language on the market for small to medium businesses, so he ordered a copy, had the fulfillment house send all their data on tape, and taught himself computer programming.

Within months, he built a robust circulation management system, enabling the marketing department and upper management to segment their circulation data and produce detailed reports about their target audiences.

Quickly realizing he could make a small fortune as an independent consultant, he quit the publishing business and went out on his own. In just a few years he made a name for himself in the FoxPro community, and travelled extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe mentoring others, as well as designing database systems for companies of all sizes. Things were going gangbusters until September 11, but after that most of his independent work dried up, and he found regular jobs programming in an assortment of industries.

He finally landed his dream job with the State of New York, where he now works with an extremely talented group of people. In the intervening years he wrote three novels: Swiss Chocolate, El Aguila, and Esmeralda. All three books got picked up by his agent, Chamein Canton of Chamein Canton Literary Agency. Chamein Canton is an award-winning, bestselling romance writer who has published nine books, and works her agency fulltime.

He and Chamein became very good friends, and he began helping her by vetting manuscripts and query letters. Eventually she gave him the authority to sign writers he really fell in love with, and is responsible for getting four new writers published. In return, she taught him the ins and outs of the book publishing industry, a leviathan that is nearly impossible to keep up with.

James Weil is as passionate about writing as he is about editing, and is torn between two loves, but most of all, he lives to see new talent get a start in the publishing business.

Videos

Colombian Guerrillas are Ambushed by Army
Recent footage of a small boat carrying drugs and weapons coming from venezuela (where FARC has settled terrorist camps) and how it is ambushed by a Colombian Army platoon which had done intelligence operations to intercept narco-terrorists in that area.

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Sandra Thomas on May 01, 2012 :
What a journey James takes you on. From page one to the finish your are transported into the Colombian countryside. The characters are very well developed and the story flows seamlessly. You will be transfixed as the story unfolds. Thanks for writing such a terrific book.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: heather akridge on April 29, 2012 :
Call me stupid, but I really did not understand the horror of the politics in Colombia to the every day coffee farmer or his everyday laborer until I read James Weil’s “El Aguila.” The book really reels you in. I read the whole thing in one 4-hour sitting. I could not put it down. It changed me forever. This eloquent novel is incredibly well researched. I found that out from the Colombian immigrant that manages the property I am moving on to (a 26 acre farm). I asked him if any of his family had been caught up in this. He told me that he had lost all of them. I was heartbroken and gave him a hug. I knew I could never return his losses. They are too many to count. This book should be required reading for high school and college Social Studies students. It is not only a very well written piece of literature; it is also an excellent description of how complex the issues are. The everyday person of Colombia could do nothing, in my opinion, to survive this situation. They have NO WHERE to live the honest hard working life they yearn for. When you read it, you will see what I mean. Your view of illegal immigrants will be forever changed, and you will wonder why your government did not tell you honestly what the situation was when you were a young person. I don’t know about your friends, but all the people I partied with would have boycotted cocaine and started a company selling coffee for higher prices to help the good Colombian people retake their land and live a good, honest life. Seriously, if you are not Colombian, you can not understand the issues in Colombia unless you read this book. It should be required reading.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

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