And the Young Shall Lead You Home: Part III of The High Duties of Pacia

1 star1 star1 star1 star0.75 star
Nothing can stop the Zafiri from conquering the land – or so it seems until four heroes and heroines appear. The only people who can save the world from terror and slavery, they unite and strengthen their power. Can they end a war, vanquish an enemy without resorting to violence, and free the white city of Abbelôn? Yes, they can in the dramatic conclusion of The High Duties of Pacia. More

Available formats: epub, mobi, pdf, rtf, lrf, pdb, txt

First 20% Sample: epub mobi (Kindle) lrf more read online
Published: April 26, 2012
Words: 79,080
Language: English
ISBN: 9781476410319
About Bob Craton

When he was a child, Bob Craton’s teachers often remarked (not always favorably) about his day-dreaming. He spent much of his time lost in his own imagination, often creating elaborate elementary school tall-tales, and the habit never went away as he grew up. Coming of age in the 1960s filled his head with dreams of saving the world and having a career in academia. Then the real world closed in. With a family to support, he took a job at the corporate grindstone, just temporarily until he could get back to grad school and earn the PhD he desired. Somehow ‘temporarily’ turned into thirty-three years of stress and boredom but he kept entertaining himself by creating stories inside his head. Interestingly (well, he hopes it’s interesting anyway), his best ideas came to him while he was stuck in rush-hour traffic during his daily commute.

At age fifty-seven, he retired early (a euphemism for ‘got laid off) and had time to put his tales on ‘paper’ (an ancient product now replaced by digital electronics). The ideas in his head were all visual, like scenes from a movie, and as he began writing, he learned to translate visual into verbal and improve his skills. Or at least, that’s what he says. He admits that sometimes minor characters – or some who weren’t included in the original plan at all – demand attention. Frequently, he agrees with them and expands their roles. Many people believe he is bonkers for believing that fictional characters talk to him, but he calls it creativity and remains unrepentant.

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Sophia Martin on July 15, 2013 : star star star star
After the tighter pacing of the second, I was a little frustrated in the way this one slowed down again, returning to the more languid pace of the first. However, questions are answered, plots are tied up nicely, and the ending is satisfying. Craton has done a great deal of meticulous work on his world, something I always appreciate almost more than any other aspect of fantasy fiction. It really is something I seek out in fantasy novels--a well-built world.

Like another reviewer mentioned, one of the things I appreciated most about this story was the way Craton handles violence, and creates good characters that confront evil without resorting to violence. It's a rare thing to see in literature (and other media) these days.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: M Mancey on June 03, 2013 : star star star star star
Another well-put-together tale and the final installment of a wonderful series. It gets more interesting with revelations of the mysterious civilization of centuries past. The mystical nature of the story also deepens with the experiences of the exiled folk and the powers exercised by the gifted ones.

The momentum of the story changes from the gripping pace of book 2 to a more ponderous one as conflicts come to a head and people get mobilized. The evil of the enemy with their twisted powers of compelling others against their will seem an inverse form of the powers possessed by the gifted ones that oppose them, which I found interesting.

I like the author's approach of getting rid of evil through non-violent means. The gifted ones have great power and use it without shedding a drop of blood. The conclusion is satisfying particularly with alternative ways of attaining order and peace.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Vanna Smythe on June 03, 2013 : star star star star star
I took a bit of a break before I read this final installment in Bob Craton's The High Duties of Pacia Trilogy, but I had absolutely no problem getting back into the story. The author does a good job of reminding the reader of past events, so that at no point did I have to stop and think back on the background of a particular development.

Since this is the conclusion of the story started in part 1 of the trilogy, I really don't want to give away any spoilers. Let me just say the the ending was incredibly satisfying and brought together all the different threads of this multi-point-of-view story. The characters all exhibited logical and satisfying change and growth, and right now I feel as though I really got to know some new people, not just fictional characters.

As I've said in my reviews of the previous books in the trilogy, the world is impeccably constructed and very well described. I did not have a single instance of being taken out of the story because of over-description, or too little of it.

All in all, I would highly recommend this trilogy to all fans of the epic fantasy genre. And due to the way this story is laid out and presented, I'm sure that even those new to reading fantasy will find this a very enjoyable tale.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: ACWinOH on Dec. 18, 2012 : star star star star star
Rich ending ... does it have to end?! Would love to know how everyone is faring! Looking forward to another of Mr. Craton's books! Yep, he's that good, gonna keep him on my list!
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Richard Dodds on Aug. 17, 2012 : star star star star star
Bob Craton has quickly become a favourite author of mine, and this book doesn't disappoint. This book wraps up the trilogy and expands on the rich world he has created. I always get the feeling when finishing his books that there's much more back story that just didn't make it in there, and I think that's what makes them so enthralling.

I'll be sure to keep an eye out for his next book.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Report this book