The Streetwise Cycle

Rated 5.00/5 based on 2 reviews
The Streetwise Cycle is a series of nine interconnected short stories about people living unexpectedly interconnected lives on the streets of Los Angeles. A view of the city from people who sleep on its streets.

Available formats: epub, mobi, pdf, rtf, lrf, pdb, txt

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About Bronwyn Mauldin

Bronwyn Mauldin is a Los Angeles-based writer. She is winner of the 2012 Coffin Factory very short story contest. Her previous work has appeared in CellStories, The Battered Suitcase, Blithe House Quarterly, Clamor magazine and From ACT-UP to the WTO. She is creator of the online video literary magazine GuerrillaReads.com and a founding member of the Future of Publishing Think Tank.

Reviews

Review by: Cheryl Klein on Sep. 14, 2010 :
I don’t usually crave interactivity, and such bells and whistles annoy me when they come at the expense of a good narrative. So I wasn’t the most obvious or un-skeptical audience for this project. But no narrative was harmed in the making of this collection, and I came away envying Bronwyn Mauldin's eye for detail as well as her technological curiosity. These are stories about the disenfranchised, packaged for readers who are interested in enfranchising themselves in new ways.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Katie Kurutz on Aug. 22, 2010 :
Those whose lives are built with a scaffolding of support and blessings can often move through a day’s tasks unaware that this fragile framework makes it all possible. Mauldin’s e-book The Streetwise Cycle, opens readers’ awareness to how fragile life can be by giving a glimpse of the pivotal moments of the lives of a handful of L.A. neighbors who have found themselves homeless. In the style of “The Soloist” by Steve Lopez, Mauldin brings readers into the homeless experience by illustrating how, when one piece of life’s scaffolding becomes weak or breaks, all that keeps us together can collapse. And yet, the book’s moments of humor, redemption and compassion allow readers to continue feeling connected to the realities of homeless life that might otherwise be too frightening.

The book’s interactive format and short story length make it an easy and illuminating evening read (especially illuminating if you are an Angelino), or a simple iPod listen during a bike or bus ride into work. Highly recommended for the urban dweller, or anyone who is interested in how momentary occurrences can change the course of a life forever.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

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