Rose in the Brier

Rated 3.00/5 based on 3 reviews
Sterling Fairchild returned from war wounded and looking for more from life than being the second son of a duke. He finds it in the arms of midwife and aspiring physician Cecilia, the disgrace and outcast of local society.
Download: epub mobi (Kindle) pdf more Online Reader
Price: Free! USD
Published by Free Rein Books
Words: 32,360
Language: English
ISBN: 9781476242736
About Liz Rein

Liz Rein is a thirty year old single girl living in southeastern Washington with her two dogs Cooper and Mikey. She spends her days flexing her creative muscles, working with clients developing marketing plans and materials for small businesses.

When not working you can usually find her curled up with a good book, most likely a romance novel. Liz started reading when she was thirteen and never looked up. Now seventeen years later she finally put the book down and picked up a pen. Encouraged by her mother she wrote her first book on a lark. The second, when inspiration struck.

Also by This Author

Also by This Publisher

Reviews

Review by: Jill Hamilton on May 10, 2013 :
So much potential. It needs a massive edit - the constant tense changing was enough to give me a headache. The punctuation was atrocious. It was a huge mess.

The plot was pretty good, until they missed a step. I loved the hero until it turned out he wasn't so much of a gentleman. And the heroine was likable until, believing she isn't worth much, sluts herself. Like mother, like daughter I suppose. Devising her own birth control proved she knew she wasn't behaving. I would have thought that being mistreated because of her status, she would have never wanted to risk having her child treated the same way. Selfish is as selfish does. At least there weren't graphic sex scenes. I left a bad taste in my mouth when they set up as lovers. This could've been a really great book. I'm more saddened than disappointed.
(review of free book)

Review by: quizzini on Feb. 24, 2013 : (no rating)
A good historical for me starts and ends with it being as factually correct as is possible, without ruining a good story, of course. This story's egregious mistakes (such as the hero reading a Dickens novel that wasn't published until 1860 and the heroine's use of chloroform, which was invented is 1831, many years after this story supposedly takes place; both facts that can be easily checked) were even more off-putting than the horrible writing style and grammatical errors (I sincerely hope the author is not a native speaker of the English language). Good thing it's free, otherwise it would be a colossal waste of money.
(review of free book)

Review by: nanette brumfield on Jan. 26, 2013 :
very good book. i enjoyed it very much.
(review of free book)

Report this book