The Woman Who Looks Both Ways (Book 4 of White Rabbit)

Adult
Rated 4.00/5 based on 1 reviews
Transported into a bizarre alternative reality, the story follows the stranded hero as he struggles through a world of which he is not part in his search for a way home. Alice in Wonderland for adults, Odyssey for the post-psychedelic age, or improbable mystical allegory, the four books of White Rabbit combine black comedy with surreal adventure into a weird and fantastical entertainment. More

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Words: 64,370
Language: British English
ISBN: 9781476450636
About Stuart Oldfield

Stuart Oldfield has lived in the UK for all of his life. A veterinarian by training, he has had a varied career as a practicing vet, a regulator of medicines, a publican, a cartoonist, and now as a smallholder in the wet, wet hills of Wales. The concept and plot for the White Rabbit books were developed during a series of solitary meditation retreats – the actually writing of the books was spread over about 15 years.

The cover design for the books is by Janet Watson, using Stuart's own illustrations. For those people who like them (assuming there are some), more of these illustrations will soon be on display on Stuart's website – watch this space!

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Reviews

Review by: Larissa Horvath on Sep. 17, 2012 :
We’ve come a long way, you and I.
The final book in the White Rabbit series is a slew of treacheries, friendships, quests and moments of self-reflection. A return of dear ol’ Nobby, a matronly spider, a chronologist pig, and discussions on the timeliness of time – it all feels like piling into the car after a long day at Disneyland. One of my favorite quotes read as follows: “You can have as many todays as you want, dear boy, as long as you only have them one at a time.”
A mystical vision takes our dear friend to the definitive forest where not all is as it seems; you expect to see a Cheshire cat reclining among the branches. You learn of the real betrayer, and almost see Loofah finally settling down for tea and complete mental breakdown. He finds his way into a weird suburbia, and from there is able to utilize a tool just for the destruction of those who wish to harm him most. He enters into a brief respite at the hands of the Savior (of some sort), and regains strength to continue on the quest.
Does he complete the journey? Does he settle into chaos? You must read to find out.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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