The Five O'Clock Follies: What's a Woman Doing Here, Anyway?

Rated 5.00/5 based on 1 reviews
A young woman's odds-against struggle to survive as a war correspondent in Saigon. Former journalist Tuohy has written what may be the best novel yet to emerge from the Vietnam War. Meticulously researched, with award-winning photos of the time. “The action is riveting and the writing is clear, detailed and highly readable. An engrossing portrait of a woman among men in wartime.” –Kirkus More

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Published by Calliope Press
Words: 122,020
Language: English
ISBN: 9780984779901
About Theasa Tuohy

Theasa Tuohy has worked for five daily newspapers and the Associated Press. She is co-book author of Scandalous: The Musical, an award winning show about the life of DH Lawrence, and has written a memoir about renovating her home in France. She is currently working on a mystery set in Paris. She lives in Manhattan.

Videos

Writing Out Loud - Interview of Theasa Tuohy by Oklahoma Educational Television
Interview of Theasa Tuohy, author of The Five O'Clock Follies,an engrossing portrait of a woman among men in wartime

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Reviews

Review by: Sharon E. Cathcart on Feb. 06, 2013 :
Theasa Tuohy's "The Five O'Clock Follies" was of interest to me on two levels: I have been a journalist, and I have been a military public affairs officer. These two worlds cover most of the characters involved in the tale.

This is the story of freelance journalist Angela Martinelli who, having just left a stifling marriage, goes to Vietnam to cover the war. She becomes friends with the male journalists after enduring some hazing, and becomes particularly close to Nick and Ford.

We see the war unfold through the eyes of the three characters, who take very different perspective. Nick and Ford are more gung-ho about events, while Angela looks for the human perspective. She sees her mission as a journalist differently from how the men view it, and takes her story enterprises in that direction as a result.

Fascinating characters, all of them flawed and human, are involved in real events like Tet and Khe Sanh -- and all of it is brought to life with Tuohy's rich, literary prose.

Those who like their historical fiction a little more on the modern side are sure to enjoy this book.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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