Captive Girl

Adult
Rated 5.00/5 based on 3 reviews
Alice watches the skies for attacks like the one that killed her parents. She lives in slavery to machines: yet she's content, supported by her minder, Dr. DeVeaux. Marika.

Then the program is shut down, and Alice is forced to return to normal functionality.

Loss of purpose...loss of time...loss of her machines.

And the revulsion of her beloved Marika, at Alice's loss of helplessness. More
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Reviews

Review by: Aster Zhen on Nov. 07, 2012 :
A deceptively complex and haunting story. The opening feels a little confused but it's well worth pushing on. This is a book I'd recommend to my friends.
(review of free book)

Review by: Wonderland Press on Sep. 18, 2012 :
I was expecting something different. The opening starts out with a girl, an asteroid, a sense of impending doom...space colonists have gone to inexplicable, almost illogical lengths to defend themselves, using little orphan girls (not so little now) to do their watching for them.

The story didn't go where I expected it to go: no explosions, invasions, or despreate, noble self-sacrificing deaths. Instead, the authorities are like, "Well, that was about enough of that, our computers have improved, you've been replaced, thanks, here's a normal body, well done and all that, goodbye."

Again, I'm expecting something different than what the author writes, but what she does write is horrifying. But that's not the worst part. It's the way that the author talked me around to thinking, "Maybe this isn't so bad." Then I started working out parallels and realized some of the implications, some of the similarities to our world.

This is one of those stories that echo in your mind, a thoughtful kind of catharsis.
(review of free book)

Review by: Wonderland Press on Sep. 18, 2012 :
I was expecting something different. The opening starts out with a girl, an asteroid, a sense of impending doom...space colonists have gone to inexplicable, almost illogical lengths to defend themselves, using little orphan girls (not so little now) to do their watching for them.

The story didn't go where I expected it to go: no explosions, invasions, or despreate, noble self-sacrificing deaths. Instead, the authorities are like, "Well, that was about enough of that, our computers have improved, you've been replaced, thanks, here's a normal body, well done and all that, goodbye."

Again, I'm expecting something different than what the author writes, but what she does write is horrifying. But that's not the worst part. It's the way that the author talked me around to thinking, "Maybe this isn't so bad." Then I started working out parallels and realized some of the implications, some of the similarities to our world.

This is one of those stories that echo in your mind, a thoughtful kind of catharsis.
(review of free book)

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