The Accident at 13th and Jefferson

Rated 4.00/5 based on 5 reviews
Josh Greenwood and his Mom and Dad are walking their neighbors to the corner when a freak accident kills one of them. But which one? Compare three different paths the same lives could take if one event is changed. The Accident at 13th and Jefferson offers three uplifting tales of middle class family life in America. More

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Words: 162,840
Language: American English
ISBN: 9781301347162
About Brenda Carlton

Brenda J. Carlton is a Grammy with an itch to finally express herself. She loves gardening, painting, science and studying people. What is a jack of all trades with a lifetime of stored up sly observations to do except write? She also paints her own book covers.

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The Accident at 13th and Jefferson: 3 Novels

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Reviews

Review by: Britt Oosterlee on April 19, 2013 :
The book really tells us three stories; each begins on the same day when an accident happens, and in the three stories different people get killed in the accident, which leads to different subsequent storylines.
I like the way the three stories show how a small difference in a single event can lead to a totally different future. Though I thought that sometimes the stories might have diverged too much (especially Max and Josh are very different), I do agree that small changes can have large consequences. Especially events that happen in one's youth can have a lifelong effect, and Carlton nicely illustrates this in this work.
Especially in the first part the storytelling sometimes gets a tad monotonous, but all in all I liked the stories. The characters were described very well and seemed very human and lifelike.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Karen Collins on Jan. 15, 2013 :
Very interesting concept for this book, well for three books in one actually. The Accident at 13th and Jefferson is really three books in one that mirror the same characters all with a common theme of an accident that takes place in the beginning of each book. The idea of what difference does this one person make in the lives of their families is what defines each book. Not to give anything away lets just say that in book one a member of a family is involved in an accident, in book two it is a different member of the same family that is involved in an accident and in book three, well you get the picture. The author then takes us through the after effects of the loss of a family member and how differently the remaining family members lives turn out. Think along the lines of "It's a Wonderful Life" with a thicker plot (certainly without the Christian aspect). There were different turns of events in each of the three books that I didn't expect and I did enjoy the thought process of wondering how life would be different in each of the three stories. On the negative side in book one there was far too much detail about a baseball game then I cared to read, far too much detail in general in fact but by book three I wanted more detail in some areas and there were just generalized statements. For me more detail on the human side (for example when Max traveled to Colorado for the first time I would have liked to see more details about how he got there: private plane; traveled with Jim the bodyguard, etc.) of things and less detail on facts would have made this story more enjoyable. Once again, very interesting concept and an overall good read.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Karen Collins on Jan. 15, 2013 : (no rating)
Very interesting concept for this book, well for three books in one actually. The Accident at 13th and Jefferson is really three books in one that mirror the same characters all with a common theme of an accident that takes place in the beginning of each book. The idea of what difference does this one person make in the lives of their families is what defines each book. Not to give anything away lets just say that in book one a member of a family is involved in an accident, in book two it is a different member of the same family that is involved in an accident and in book three, well you get the picture. The author then takes us through the after effects of the loss of a family member and how differently the remaining family members lives turn out. Think along the lines of "It's a Wonderful Life" with a thicker plot (certainly without the Christian aspect). There were different turns of events in each of the three books that I didn't expect and I did enjoy the thought process of wondering how life would be different in each of the three stories. On the negative side in book one there was far too much detail about a baseball game then I cared to read, far too much detail in general in fact but by book three I wanted more detail in some areas and there were just generalized statements. For me more detail on the human side (for example when Max traveled to Colorado for the first time I would have liked to see more details about how he got there: private plane; traveled with Jim the bodyguard, etc.) of things and less detail on facts would have made this story more enjoyable. Once again, very interesting concept and an overall good read.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Marianne Swenson on Dec. 28, 2012 :
We've all had those 'What if ... ' moments: "What if I'd gone through that traffic light instead of waiting?" "What if I'd been three further ahead in the line for lottery tickets?" An infinitesimal change in circumstances with life changing consequences. The literary conceit of 'The Accident at 13th and Jefferson' delightfully explores just that. Three different takes on the same event -- a rock thrown up by a careening motorcycle strikes and kills a bystander. A boy's birthday party has just ended. He and his parents are walking his best friend and the friend's mother through the front yard to their home next door. In the first tale, it is the boy's mother who dies, leaving her husband struggling to find the parenting skills he'd relied upon her to provide. In the next, it is the father who dies, leaving the boy to find a male role model in his unreliable and criminal uncle. In the final story, the boy himself is struck down, leaving his parents and best friend each to struggle with their grief. That the best friend doesn't know he is the son of a presidential contender spices up the mix even more.

I liked that more is revealed about each character as the book progressed, and appreciated the short coda at the end in which everyone is spared. Carlton's dialogue is well written and her plot moves along nicely, while still allowing for descriptive character development. Having lost a parent as a young girl, I was concerned this would be an emotionally difficult book to read. My trepidation was unwarranted -- the characters' grief felt utterly genuine but not overdone. Indeed, overall it was an uplifting book and a paean to the strength of love and friendship.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Kathleen McCarthy on Dec. 27, 2012 :
I received this book in exchange for an honest review. I really liked the book (s). They each had the same characters reacting to the same accident with a different victim. Great premise. The first and the last were lighter but still showed great human reactions. The middle story was much darker but really well done. I liked the book.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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