Troll

Rated 4.67/5 based on 3 reviews
At what point did humanity learn to fear each other? To hate? Paleo-Anthropologist Ariel Connor thinks she knows. She just can't prove it yet, but her newest find, high in a Norwegian Valley may give her the proof she needs. Those scary stories we've told our children to keep them from roaming too far outside the gleam of the porch light may have come from real incidents, many, many years ago. More

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Words: 62,950
Language: American English
ISBN: 9781301662166
About Richard Sutton

A former commune-dwelling goat herding hippie and guitar picker turned tree planter and ski mechanic, illustrator, wood carver and carpenter; author Richard Sutton left college and hitch-hiked to New York in 1972 with forty dollars in his pocket and no preconceptions.

"There, I met my wife, worked in advertising and design until I was an empty, hollow shell, then ran a retail gallery, becoming an Indian Trader in 1985." More travel followed and a home in New Mexico. He finally saw the light of day and began to write fiction more or less full-time, in 1996.

An historical fiction/fantasy The Red Gate began it all in 2009, then a sequel, The Gatekeepers in 2010. 2011, saw the release of his first SciFi novella, Home, and Troll, a prehistoric-fantasy, followed in 2012. 2014, Back to Santa Fe was released April 1st, writing as WT Durand and On Parson's Creek, a YA mystery was just released in October. He lives with his wife and their cats, raccoons and other boarders in New York.

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Reviews

Review by: Chris The Story Reading Ape on May 21, 2013 :
A thought provoking, sensitively told and believable story of a series of events that could have happened in the distant, prehistoric past, when two species of Homo Sapiens discovered each other in the far north of Scandinavia.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Wendy Bertsch on Oct. 19, 2012 :
This is as good a piece of prehistoric fiction as I've read. The characters are engaging and the story is gripping and plausible.

The author's research is sound, and he's left us leeway to believe that the 'trolls' may have survived long enough to be a vestigial memory in fairy tales. I like that.

The less entertaining take-away, of course, is the serious probability that some of our more unreasoning prejudices have very deep roots..
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Victoria Zigler on Oct. 17, 2012 :
This is a well written and fantastic story, with excellent worldbuilding and well rounded characters. It's a perfect example of the pain and suffering that can come from the fear based predjudices people are so often known for.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

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