Lady Luck Runs Out (Pet Psychic Mystery No. 2)

Rated 5.00/5 based on 2 reviews
Fall tourist season in St. Pete has kicked into high gear for Darwin Winters, pet psychic, but that doesn't stop her from getting tangled up in a new murder investigation.

Rose Faraday, a gypsy fortune teller, has succumbed to a rattlesnake bite in her own condo. After a run-in with the victim's traumatized cat, Darwin knows it was no freak accident. Will the killer get away with murder? More

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Words: 55,250
Language: English
ISBN: 9781301566297
About Shannon Esposito

Shannon Esposito is a Florida author who believes in the power of an open mind. Exploring the unknown through writing fiction is her idea of magic. Her novels are sometimes steeped in science and sometimes wrapped in the paranormal but, as in real life, the heart of all stories is the mystery.

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Reviews

Review by: Prudence MacLeod on Nov. 17, 2013 :
This past week I finished reading Lady Luck Runs Out by Shannon Esposito. This is the second book of her Pet Psychic Mystery series. I really enjoyed the first one; Karma is a Bitch and was looking forward to a chance to read Lady Luck Runs Out. It did not disappoint.
Have you ever seen a cat staring at nothing like she knows something you don’t? Perhaps they do. In this case, Lady Luck truly does know something and Darwin is determined to discover what it is. Add in a jealous lover, a madcap sister, a tall dark stranger with riveting eyes, a mystery, and you have the makings of a full evening of entertainment. Yes, I read it from start to finish. I recommend you do too.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Anne G on Nov. 16, 2012 :
A well-written and entertaining story. I look forward to reading more about Darwin (our heroine) and her family and friends. I certainly hope that we have not seen the last of Zach!

Ms. Esposito's depiction of the snakes that slither in and out of scenes is measured and sensible. Refreshing to read a book that avoids the hyperbole so often connected with the mere mention of serpents. Hats off to Ms. Esposito for that achievement.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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