Children of Arnhem's Kaleidoscope

Rated 4.67/5 based on 3 reviews
It was hot. There was sudden stillness in the late afternoon air and the surface of the small waterhole shone with unnatural smoothness. Fresh pig tracks at water's edge suggested pigs just gone. Two bubbles popped to the surface near the edge of the pool; just decaying vegetation, said my mind. I should have smelt crocodile!

A story of a missionary family in remote aboriginal Australia. More
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About Graham Wilson

Graham Wilson lives in Sydney Australia. He has completed and published eight books, published by Smashwords. They comprise two series, The Old Balmain House Series and the Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series along with a family memoir. Children of Arnhem's Kaleidoscope.

The first series starts with a novel called "The Old Balmain House" based on an old a weatherboard cottage in Sydney where the author lived. Here a photo was discovered of a small girl who lived and died about 100 years ago. The book imagines the story of her life and family, based in the real Balmain, an early inner Sydney suburb, with it's locations and and historical events providing part of the story background. The second novel in this series, Lizzie's Tale" builds on "The Old Balmain House" setting, It is the story of a working class teenage girl who lives in this same house in the 1950s and 1960s, It tells of how, when she becomes pregnant she is determined not to surrender her baby for adoption, and of her struggle to survive in this unforgiving society. The third novel in this series, Devil's Choice, follows the next generation of the family in Lizzie's Tale. Lizzie's daughter is faced with the awful choice of whether to seek the help of one of her mother's rapists' in trying to save the life of her own daughter who is inflicted with an incurable disease.

The Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series comprises five novels based in Outback Australia. The first novel "Just Visiting." tells the story of an English backpacker, Susan, who visits the Northern Territory and becomes captivated and in great danger from a man who loves crocodiles. The second book in the series, "The Diary" follows the consequences of the first book based around the discovery of this man's remains and his diary and Susan, being placed on trial for murder. The third book, "The Empty Place" is about Susan's struggle to retain her sanity in jail while her family and friends desperately try to find out what really happened on that fateful day before it is too late. In "The Lost Girls" Susan vanishes and it tells the story of the search for her and four other lost girls whose passports were found in the possession of the man she killed. The final book in the series, "Sunlit Shadow Dance" is scheduled for release in late 2015. A preview of the first part is currently available on this site.

The book, "Children of Arnhem's Kaleidoscope" is the story of the author's own life in the Northern Territory. It tells of his childhood in an aboriginal community in remote Arnhem Land, in Australia's Northern Territory, one of its last frontiers. It tells of the people, danger and beauty of this place, and of its transformation over the last half century with the coming of aboriginal rights and the discovery or uranium. It also tells of his surviving an attack by a large crocodile and of his work over two decades in the outback of the NT.

Graham is in the early stages of planning a memoir about his family's connections with Ireland called "Memories Only Remain" and also is compiling information for a book about the early NT cattle industry, its people and its stories,

Graham writes mostly for the creative pleasure it brings him. He is particularly gratified each time an unknown person chooses to download and read something he has written and write a review - good or bad, as this gives him an insight into what readers enjoy and helps him make ongoing improvements to his writing.

In his non writing life he is a veterinarian working with farmers, as well as wild animals and in conservation across Australia

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: JennyLP on Aug. 12, 2014 :
This delightful book gives a wonderful insight into life on an aboriginal mission in the 1950s, 60s and 70s with its incredible hardships compensated by an amazing lifestyle and enduring friendships. Graham’s descriptions of his childhood and the Arnhemland landscape bring it all vividly to life. It is also an insight into aboriginal society before and after it was demonised by alcohol with all its inherent problems.
For those interested in our early explorers Graham also follows Ludwig Leichhardt’s journey via his journal through this part of Arnhemland and is able to identify most of the places that Leichhardt visited and to give them their modern names so that his journey can be easily followed on a map.
I thoroughly recommend this book to a wide variety of readers from those of us who have visited Arnhemland to those who perhaps dream of doing so.
(review of free book)

Review by: eddieR on March 18, 2014 :
really enjoyed this book and the real life insight it gives into Australia's Northern Territory with lots of interesting stories which make me want to visit
(review of free book)

Review by: Amanda Ryan on Oct. 18, 2013 :
After reading a great but horrific novel about a backpacker, a crazy and a crocodile in the Outback of Australia's Northern Territory, I have been looking around for other books to read to give me more insight into this place.

I have now discovered this one, it is a real life story about a family which lives and grows in an aboriginal community in Arnhem Land, with the central character moving from childhood to an adult and working across the NT.

The story is told both through the eyes of the father in the family and the son, and this works well. It is a moving story about the way this place has developed, the joy and pain of aboriginal development and the commitment made by various people. It also gives much information about other parts of the NT and life on cattle and buffalo stations

It is also full of interesting little stories and anecdotes, including a real life crocodile attack which the main character is incredibly lucky to survive.

The only fault is it could do with a little more editing to trim it a bit in some places, but this is a minor fault.

Well worth a read if you want to know more about this part of Australia.

And if you want to read the novel I have just read its link is
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/364141
There are some interesting parallels between the two stories. Could they be connected?
(reviewed within a month of purchase)
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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