On Air - Fastrack into Radio

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Want to become a professional broadcaster? Are you one already - but find your career is stalling?
This book covers all the fields the professional broadcaster is likely to encounter. From winning the audition to advanced broadcast techniques. Written by the MD of the specialized broadcast training company, the Broadcast Development Group. More

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About Malcolm Russell

First experience in Radio and Television was at age 16 and then went on to a professional career in the field, initially on air and then in management. Took a six year break to sail a home built yacht with his late wife and (then) four year old daughter, covering some 40 000 miles in the process. Writer, film-maker and broadcast trainer consulting to a number of broadcast operations, most notably DSTV's SuperSport where he handles training and coaching of all on-air presenters and commentators. Founder and MD of the Broadcast Development Group.

Videos

How to Win a Career in Professional Radio (Part 1)
If you've done all the practice, polished your act and now you are ready to win the audition and the job, then this is how to go about it. The first of 2 videos but more free videos on other aspects of radio still to come so SUBSCRIBE. Explore http://www.bdg.co.za

Your Career in Professional Radio
All you need to know about the scope of your career as a professional broadcaster...

Winning the Audition Part 2
If you've done all the practice, polished your act and now you are ready to win the audition and the job, then this is how to go about it. The 2nd of 2 videos but more free videos on other aspects of radio still to come so SUBSCRIBE. Explore http://www.bdg.co.za

Reviews

Review by: Igor Structov on March 20, 2013 : (no rating)
I have been listening to the radio for an alarming number of decades, a full one of which I spent as the radio columnist/critic for South Africa's largest circulation daily newspaper. Allowing for individual style, the differences between good and bad or effective and ineffective broadcasters are succinctly encompassed in the accrued wisdom contained in this book. It starts from understanding that what matters is what's heard, not what's said. Russell explains this in the twin basics of (1) PROFESSIONALISM (think first, speak clearly and concisely, respect language, pronounce names correctly, etc) and (2) IMMEDIACY - the idea of radio as a friend. He is right that people listen not to radio but to PEOPLE, and we quickly tire of listening to verbose, arrogant, self-promoting prats. Talking to a mike requires as much self-assurance as standing up on a stage, and like an actor what a broadcaster needs to project is persona, not ego. A broadcaster entertain his audience, not himself.
Russell was a fine broadcaster who did that: you felt you knew him. Then when he moved into management, he turned an ailing music station into a winner and pioneered national talk radio: you felt you knew the station. He embraced and applied new technologies to modernise the rapport with listeners, not to replace it.
The current crop of talking heads that love to hear the sound of their own voices have lost the plot. This book needs to be read widely so we recognise what we’ve lost before it’s too late to get it back.
(reviewed long after purchase)

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