In and Out of Darkness: Losing Vision, Gaining Insight

Rated 5.00/5 based on 2 reviews
Beautiful and moving story of going blind, and how the author picked up her life again, changed careers and traveled to Russia to adopt a child. Funny, moving and inspirational. Well written.

Available formats: epub mobi pdf rtf lrf pdb txt html

First 5% Sample: epub mobi (Kindle) lrf more Online Reader
About Linda Goodspeed

Linda Goodspeed is the author of three books. Her most recent, In and Out of Darkness: Losing Vision, Gaining Insight, is a memoir of going blind. Reviewer Sherry Hardy says In and Out of Darkness “should be on everyone's short list of vivid and yet inwardly honest 'life so far' stories.”

Goodspeed’s other books include Pico, Vermont: 75th Anniversary Edition (2012), a history of one of America’s oldest ski resorts, and Redfield Proctor and the Division of Rutland (History Press, 2011), an historical novel about one of America’s leading business and political figures of the late 1800s.

Linda Goodspeed graduated from the University of Vermont, and was one of the first femaile sports editors at a daily newspaper before losing her eyesight. She earned a master’s degree from Boston University and worked in health care journalism at Massachusetts General Hospital and at a health care nonprofit. In 1999, she adopted a two-year-old baby girl from Russia, one of the first, maybe only, single blind people to negotiate the international adoption process.

Goodspeed, her daughter Masha, and their dog Ziggy live in Vermont. She is a widely published freelance writer, and also does public speaking. For more information about Linda Goodspeed, visit her website: http://lindagoodspeed.com/

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Sherry Hardy on Jan. 07, 2013 : (no rating)
I love a good, honest memoir. The modern problem is, there aren't more than a handful a year that are worth a discretionary time investment greater than watching an entire episode of Downton Abbey uninterrupted. Linda Goodspeed's "In and Out of Darkness, Losing Vision, Gaining Insight", however, should be on everyone's short list of vivid and yet inwardly honest 'life so far' stories for 2013. For me, a terrific read involves at least one instance of an embarrassing omg-honestly email to my best friend para-typing a passage that nailed our friendship to within a centimeter of its definition (and said info had to be shared THEN).

Goodspeed's story is as tightly written and interesting as it is inspirational, likely because she kept 'Why me?'s' to a minimum and never abandoned her goals through quite an impressive succession of obstacles. You don't forget that the heroine is blind, you have simply slipped inside her world so comfortably that the customary extra layer of distance is dispelled. It was a grin-out-loud victory moment when she was assigned to cover the Sarajevo Winter Olympics. I cheered all the more for her when she did manage to adopt her daughter in Russia and then succeed at changing careers with the added demands of 'single motherhood'.

As the author herself says, "Terrorism and cancer will kill you. No one has ever died of blindness. Still, people fear it more than almost anything else. I know. I went through it."

[You also just don't run across many authors you want to dork up for and email out of admiration, including the gushing parallels [not even close] to adventurous experiences you too had scored in your salad days.]
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

Review by: Maurie Hill on Nov. 25, 2012 :
I really enjoyed this book. Linda is a regular person who did very big things and I got caught up in her journey, rooting for her the whole way. There was humor and insight into working at a Vermont newspaper, a non-profit in Boston, and then working for herself. And her adoption of a little girl from Russia topped it off emotionally for me.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

Report this book