Peter and Paul

Rated 5.00/5 based on 9 reviews
Peter and Paul is a natural sequel to my historical novel Yeshûa—Personal Memoir of the Missing Years of Jesus. The two journeys, which Peter and Paul took, illustrate the contrasting views of the essence of the scriptural teaching, each necessary for the fulfillment of its intent. The lives of the two apostles show that there are many ways to the Kingdom of Heaven. More

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Published by Inhousepress
Words: 85,940
Language: English
ISBN: 9781301220830
About Stan I.S. Law

Stan I.S. Law (Stanislaw Kapuscinski), architect, sculptor and prolific writer was educated in Poland and England. While there, he also played concert violin, and studied opera at the Guildhall School of Music.

Since 1965 he has resided in Canada. His special interests cover a broad spectrum of arts, sciences and philosophy. His fiction and non-fiction attest to his particular passion for the scope and the development of human potential. He authored more than thirty books, eighteen of them novels.
Under his real name he published seven non-fiction books sharing his vision of reality. His non-fiction books can be found at:

http://stanlaw.ca

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/stankapt

http://www.inhousepress.ca

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias=stripbooks&field-keywords=stan+i.s.+law&x=15&y=17

As an architect [RIBA, MRAIC, OAQ ret.] he designed a number high rise buildings in Montreal, including Regency Hyatt Hotel (now Delta), Place Mercantile, Headquarters for the Mutual Alliance, as well as a number of low and middle rise structures for private clients. In the National Capital he was the associate in charge of design of Royal Bank Headquarters on Sparks Street.

His novels include:

NOW—Being and Becoming
One Just Man (Winston Trilogy Book I)
Elohim—Masters and Minions (Winston Trilogy Book II)
Winstons' Kingdom (Winston Trilogy Book III)
Yeshûa—Personal Memoir of the Missing Years of Jesus
Peter and Paul—Intuitive sequel to Yeshûa
The Avatar Syndrome (prequel to Headless World)
Headless World—The Vatican Incident (Sequel to Avatar Syndrome).
The Princess
Alec (Alexander Trilogy Book I)
Alexander (Alexander Trilogy Book II).
Sacha—The Way Back (Alexander Trilogy Book III).
The Gate—Things my Mother told me.
Marvin Clark—In Search of Freedom.
Enigma of the Second Coming
Gift of Gamman
Wall—Love, Sex, and Immortality (Aquarius Trilogy Book I)
Pluto Effect (Aquarius Trilogy Book II)
OLYMPUS—Of Gods and Men (Aquarius Trilogy Book III)

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Reviews

Review by: Amy Taylor on April 12, 2014 :
Peter and Paul is an intriguing and intellectual examination and recreation of the lives of the Apostles Peter and Paul.

In this book Stan I.S. Law uses historical and spiritual texts (and some contemplative imagination) to recreate the life and journeys of these two very different men. We learn who they were, the different world they lived in, what moved them, inspired them and how they took their different paths to instilling what they learned from Jesus. We meet many historical figures through this book and learn of them all in a more human and enlightening manner.

The weaknesses and strengths that humankind is endowed with and what will bring out our power to invoke these attributes and frailties is a remarkable thing. To be able to explain a man’s life in a way that makes sense and creates a whole picture is a remarkable feat. Stan I.S. Law has a genuine talent for such feats.

I highly recommend it!
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Hanna K. Loda on Dec. 03, 2012 :
Tears, admiration, on occasion laughter, they all touched me as I followed the struggles which Peter and Paul went through. What an incredible world it must have been. Life was cheap, money and power seemed to rule all, even as today. Yet, those two men had something that no one seems to have today: an unshaken and unshakable faith in the Master they followed.

Stan Law paints the past with a deft hand. I felt as though he took me back to the day when Christianity was no more than a Jewish sect. Fascinating and, often, scary.

Yes, a fascinating book by any standard.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

Review by: Sylvester Drake on Nov. 29, 2012 :
In addition to enjoying the book very much, I am particularly grateful for the blog, which Mr. Law included at the end of his novel. I found it most enlightening to learn how an author’s mind works. It seems that one must really enter the reality of the story one is telling, rather like the Method actor becomes immersed in his part.

Having said that, the results are as impressive as in his previous novel, Yeshûa—Personal Memoir, which I still look at periodically. Peter and Paul really is a great sequel, and the final chapters absolutely breathtaking.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

Review by: Marlon (Marvin) D. Clark on Nov. 27, 2012 :
“Peter and Paul” is a great book. It is as filled with action as with poetic prose. Yet, after this fascinating exposé on the lives of the two principal apostles, Law treated us to a surprise like no other. He added the notes he’d made which led to the development of his novel. The notes he’d made during his research. I’ve never had an opportunity to peek into a writer’s mind until now. An utterly unique idea, which helped me, even after the fact, so to speak, to understand the novel better. Thanks for the novel and special thanks for the notes. Most enlightening.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Barbara Woolfe on Nov. 27, 2012 :
I am still amazed how Stan Law managed to unfold history before my eyes. Love, hate, murder, mystery, tension, philosophy and metaphysics are all mixed in a cauldron of a fast paced novel that kept me reading into the early hours. The characters are as real: strong yet with human weaknesses; very human, yet rising head and shoulders above the others. Well, above most of us.

PS. The novel is worthy successor to Law’s Yeshûa—Personal Memoir. If you liked one, you’ll love the other. I did!
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Adam Kerry on Nov. 25, 2012 :
When in school, I was told to study the Acts of the Apostles. I found them boring. Many years have passed since…

I just finished reading Law’s Peter and Paul; surely a faithful representation of history, which reads like a thriller with historical murder story overtones. In addition, Stan Law shares his philosophy with us, enriching us with the depth of his knowledge and even more so with the depth of his metaphysical understanding.

An extraordinary book, a worthy successor to his Yeshûa—Personal Memoir of the Missing Years of Jesus.
(review of free book)

Review by: Bohdan Czytelnik on Nov. 25, 2012 :
What I find interesting about this book is that, although it is about preachers, the book itself is in no way preaching. It strikes me as a serious attempt to present the incredible difficulties that the early Christians faced to aver the “Good News”. Both characters, Peter and Paul, are very real, endowed with great talents but also with foibles as ordinary men. This is a book that all Christians should read, and non-Christians would enjoy a novel that, in spite of its metaphysical content, reads like a thriller!
Also, there is an added bonus at the end.
(review of free book)

Review by: Jo Steinman on Nov. 24, 2012 :
Since I read Law’s Yeshûa, I wondered how would it be possible to spread the teaching such as was implied in that novel. The complexities of the international relations of that day, must have multiplied the difficulties, which the protagonists had to face.

And yet, Stan Law, with his usual expertise created a reality in which Peter, Paul, and finally Nero, had to face the challenges to establish their particular vision of reality. It is a masterly novel of psychological diversity.
(review of free book)

Review by: Anetta Bach on Nov. 22, 2012 :
I read Peter and Paul in a proof form. As in his previous novels, Stan Law offers us an in-depth psychological study of two men struggling to meet their destinies. The characters come to life, the surroundings are real. I was transported some 2000 years back into the history, at the very beginning of Christianity. It is amazing how different those days were. Perhaps so was the intent of Yeshûa’s teaching.
Those were very different times, yet, on closer examination, we, humanity, do not appear to have changed much. Perhaps not at all.
(review of free book)

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