The Day Gaul Died

Rated 4.80/5 based on 6 reviews
This is the story of the Celtic tribes of Gaul united under the great king Vercingetorix and their fight against subjugation by Rome, and Julius Caesar.

This is not a war story but the story of a people. It ends at Alesia in central Gaul. Rome won that final battle and took a million Celtic Gauls in chains to the slave markets, or left them in the soil; that day that Gaul died.

Available formats: epub mobi pdf rtf txt html

First 20% Sample: epub mobi (Kindle) Online Reader
Words: 73,410
Language: English
ISBN: 9781301713684
About Pat Mizell

I love to read history; and every time I read something new I have questions. I read the what and when in the book but I want to know the why. It's always troubled me when the author doesn't say and I wonder why not. Then I have to find out, and the answer is often a fascinating story that history has overlooked.

I want to tell that story. I try to humanize the great events of history for they involved real people with human frailties and emotions like we all have. Nothing is ever black or white; I live in the gray then I tell the tale.

Reviews

Review by: Roy on Feb. 09, 2013 :
This is a great book! There is something for any and every one that reads. It's a good/bad, happy/sad kinda thing...
The way the author writes, Pat, he makes you feel like you are actually there in that place and time. Lots of action and in your face situations. I agree with other reviews, this would make a GREAT movie, because it is a GREAT book! The history lesson may not be what you were expecting but none the less, what a lesson it is. If you are a person that doesn't like to read, this is the book for you. Captivating, and won't let you go. You develope a need to know more as you go along. The author's ability to describe enables you to seemingly smell the smells, hear the sounds, and actually makes you feel like you're a part of the story. I will read it several more times, due to being able to get more and more out of it with each read. There were times that I was actually tired after reading certain parts. It's like I was a part of the battle, hunt, or whatever Pat was describing. Very, Very, COOL. I really had no expectations, but I was pleasantly surprised with how wild, entertaining, informative, and rewarding this read is. Do yourself a favour, and read this. You won't regret it...
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Melissa Shipley on Feb. 07, 2013 : (no rating)
This book The Day Gaul Died is a great read. I'm not really into this genre of read per say, but I just couldn't put the book down. He makes you feel like you are a character in the book and are right there with the other people.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Sandy Iredale on Jan. 23, 2013 :
Would make a great movie.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: R.W. Peake on Dec. 18, 2012 :
A great story told from a different viewpoint

I must admit that, as the author of Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul, which tells essentially the same story as Mr. Mizell's but from the more common viewpoint of the Roman side, I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked this up. But I decided to give it a go since I am, before anything else, a huge fan of this genre.

I'm glad I did, and being completely honest, I wish Mr. Mizell had written his work before mine. Although I'm more a "grunt's-eye view" storyteller myself, what Mr. Mizell offers is a fresh and unique perspective of a story that has been told many, many times, but always from the perspective of the winner. Most importantly, I got a sense of what it might have FELT like to be on the other side, watching the relentless, remorseless machines that were the Legions of Rome, grinding and crushing everything and everyone in their path.

By focusing his story on Vercassivellaunos, Mr. Mizell puts us close enough to the inner workings and mindset of Vercingetorix, but allows for a more detached viewpoint as the Arverni leader comes perilously close to accomplishing what no other Gallic tribe had been able to do in the previous five years, defeat Caesar and his Legions. No one else was able to unite as many of the tribes, and he was the only one who correctly determined that a war of attrition and a strategic attack of the food supplying the men in Caesar's army was the only way to achieve victory. What Mr. Mizell does is give us a glimpse into how Vercingetorix might have actually accomplished this, through threats, blackmail, flattery and bribery.

As I said, while I personally like a bit more "blood and guts", Mr. Mizell is able to focus on the human aspect of what was a titanic struggle and make it so interesting, and so real that I didn't miss it.

All in all, I think this is a great work, especially for his first book, and I think that anyone who is a true student of Caesar, the Legions, or this time period in Roman history should make this required reading to get a glimpse into the other side of war, and the story of The Day Gaul Died.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: R.W. Peake on Dec. 18, 2012 :
A great story told from a different viewpoint

I must admit that, as the author of Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul, which tells essentially the same story as Mr. Mizell's but from the more common viewpoint of the Roman side, I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked this up. But I decided to give it a go since I am, before anything else, a huge fan of this genre.

I'm glad I did, and being completely honest, I wish Mr. Mizell had written his work before mine. Although I'm more a "grunt's-eye view" storyteller myself, what Mr. Mizell offers is a fresh and unique perspective of a story that has been told many, many times, but always from the perspective of the winner. Most importantly, I got a sense of what it might have FELT like to be on the other side, watching the relentless, remorseless machines that were the Legions of Rome, grinding and crushing everything and everyone in their path.

By focusing his story on Vercassivellaunos, Mr. Mizell puts us close enough to the inner workings and mindset of Vercingetorix, but allows for a more detached viewpoint as the Arverni leader comes perilously close to accomplishing what no other Gallic tribe had been able to do in the previous five years, defeat Caesar and his Legions. No one else was able to unite as many of the tribes, and he was the only one who correctly determined that a war of attrition and a strategic attack of the food supplying the men in Caesar's army was the only way to achieve victory. What Mr. Mizell does is give us a glimpse into how Vercingetorix might have actually accomplished this, through threats, blackmail, flattery and bribery.

As I said, while I personally like a bit more "blood and guts", Mr. Mizell is able to focus on the human aspect of what was a titanic struggle and make it so interesting, and so real that I didn't miss it.

All in all, I think this is a great work, especially for his first book, and I think that anyone who is a true student of Caesar, the Legions, or this time period in Roman history should make this required reading to get a glimpse into the other side of war, and the story of The Day Gaul Died.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: R.W. Peake on Dec. 18, 2012 :
A great story told from a different viewpoint

I must admit that, as the author of Marching With Caesar-Conquest of Gaul, which tells essentially the same story as Mr. Mizell's but from the more common viewpoint of the Roman side, I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked this up. But I decided to give it a go since I am, before anything else, a huge fan of this genre.

I'm glad I did, and being completely honest, I wish Mr. Mizell had written his work before mine. Although I'm more a "grunt's-eye view" storyteller myself, what Mr. Mizell offers is a fresh and unique perspective of a story that has been told many, many times, but always from the perspective of the winner. Most importantly, I got a sense of what it might have FELT like to be on the other side, watching the relentless, remorseless machines that were the Legions of Rome, grinding and crushing everything and everyone in their path.

By focusing his story on Vercassivellaunos, Mr. Mizell puts us close enough to the inner workings and mindset of Vercingetorix, but allows for a more detached viewpoint as the Arverni leader comes perilously close to accomplishing what no other Gallic tribe had been able to do in the previous five years, defeat Caesar and his Legions. No one else was able to unite as many of the tribes, and he was the only one who correctly determined that a war of attrition and a strategic attack of the food supplying the men in Caesar's army was the only way to achieve victory. What Mr. Mizell does is give us a glimpse into how Vercingetorix might have actually accomplished this, through threats, blackmail, flattery and bribery.

As I said, while I personally like a bit more "blood and guts", Mr. Mizell is able to focus on the human aspect of what was a titanic struggle and make it so interesting, and so real that I didn't miss it.

All in all, I think this is a great work, especially for his first book, and I think that anyone who is a true student of Caesar, the Legions, or this time period in Roman history should make this required reading to get a glimpse into the other side of war, and the story of The Day Gaul Died.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Report this book