Love Tears & Autism

When Cecily prayed that God would teach her to really love people, she was hoping that the answer would be easy. She didn't expect to have her life turned upside down, her dreams shattered and her priorities rearranged. Just weeks after her prayer, Cecily's three year old son was diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder. It would be a difficult journey, and yet it would lead to real, gritty love. More

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Words: 51,630
Language: Australian English
ISBN: 9781301089932
About Cecily Anne Paterson

I'm a young adult/teen writer of realistic fiction all about friendships and relationships.

First up, some random facts. I've wanted to be a writer since I was seven years old. (I'm now a lot older than that!) I love cake, especially chocolate cake, and I really hate bananas. My favourite colour is turquoise blue. I wish I'd done ballet or tap dancing and I'd still like to do ballroom lessons one day. I'm not very good at sport. I'm not the worst, but I get all confused when they pass me the ball! I used to have my nose pierced. And no, the snot doesn't come out the hole when you sneeze.

More important stuff: I'm married to a guy who has red hair and we have a dog with the same colour fur, but none of our four kids ended up with the red hair. They all started out blonde, just like I did. Actually, they all started out bald, just like I did, and then turned blonde. For the record, we've got two boys and two girls which is kind of what I'd always hoped for. (I made big plans with my 'boyfriend' when I was five. We were going to get married and have two boys and two girls, but all their names were going to begin with R, which certainly hasn't happened!)

I was born in Australia but when I was 3 my parents moved our family to Pakistan where we lived until I was 16. We had regular visits back to Australia, but I really only liked it for its TV programs, chocolate and grandparents, none of which we had in Pakistan. I went to a British school for primary and then an international boarding school for most of my high school. I went to school every day with my friends, then went and had dinner with them, and then shared a dorm room at night. It was equal parts amazing fun and horrendous terrible. I know what it feels like to be a bit of an outsider, to have your friends leave, or to have big upheavals in your life. When I came back to Australia with my international, half-American, half-English accent everyone wanted me to "say something - it sounds so cute!" but it just sounded normal to me! (Now I sound like more of a regular Aussie. I tend to adapt.)

My aim is to write two books a year for the next ten years.

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