Jack Dawkins

Rated 4.40/5 based on 6 reviews
Jack Dawkins, once known as the Artful Dodger in the streets of London, was sent to Australia on a prison ship when he was little more than a boy. Now he has returned to find that London has changed while the boy has turned into a man. More

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Published by Golbin Publishing
Words: 82,900
Language: English
ISBN: 9781301012435
About Charlton Daines

Charlton Daines is an academic and an aficionado of fine Literature. As such, he has sought to add to the collective of world Literature with the occasional selection that might appeal to those with a love of Classics and Historical Fiction.

The occasional spot of Humour or flights of fancy are likely to slip into this all too serious catalogue of self-indulgent scribblings.

Charlton Daines was born in London, but currently lives in the middle of England with his family, which includes an odd selection of common and pedigree cats.

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Reviews

Review by: Sharon Clarke on Oct. 03, 2013 :
(E-book was gifted by author for review)

Fans of the book Oliver Twist will love this story about the artful dodger all grown up. I have not read Oliver Twist and wondered did I need to before I started reading it, but I need not have worried as it did not focus on Oliver in any great way.To start with I wondered how this story would be handled being a sequel of sorts to such a well known classic but it was handled carefully and with much love from the author for the time period and the characters involved. I absolutely adored the old style of writing and story telling that this tale serves up to the reader. The author takes you right into the heart of London and it’s many and varied characters. A favourite part for me was the use of the old English language, you can almost hear the characters talking in that wonderful old slang.

Jack (The Artful Dodger) Dawkins comes back to London after a stretch of time in Australia for crimes he committed at a child. In his absence the faces and the city itself have change. But ever the artful dodger he finds himself back in the thick of things faster than even he perhaps wants to. Life takes him from one side of the law to the other and from one lifestyle to another to suit the situations at hand, going from street pickpocket to hero and back again. All the characters though seemingly separated by their class and lifestyles all intertwine in the end.

All in all a wonderful story about a very interesting character. Fans of Dickens should not be disappointed by the tell of this tale and is definitely worth a read.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: albert garcia on Sep. 10, 2013 :
Jack Dawkins by Charlton Daines
My rating: 3 of 5 stars
I received a free copy of this ebook via Goodreads to review. A grown Jack Dawkins returns to London after fleeing the penal colony in Australia. Stepping off the ship he is instantly hit with the changes to the city and the old neighborhood he had grown up in with the cast of young thieves and their caretaker Fagin. Memories flood the mind and heart of the grown Artful Dodger. Beginning to ply his trade, Dawkins makes his way through the seedy underworld of London and finds in some ways, nothing ever changes. As he carouses among the wealthy, picking pockets along the way, Dawkins stumbles into his old friend; Oliver. ...Oliver, for his part, did not appear to share the sense of comradeship. "Once a thief always a thief, don't think I don't know that you'd steal from me just as quick as you please" "Oliver! You wound me!" Jack feigned deeply hurt feelings. "You done alright, but you was Fagin's boy, same as me." "For a day," Oliver countered. "Two if you count the kidnapping." As the friendship rekindles, Dawkins is introduced to Oliver's fiancé and her family. Then tragedy strikes, for their young child is kidnapped and as with the past and the kidnapping of Oliver; Jack Dawkins must once again become the Artful Dodger to save the child. Charlton Daines does a masterful job of picking up the story of Jack Dawkins and bringing about a mature and grown Artful Dodger. Who despite his strongest inclinations, actually desires to do good and become the man the Oliver once thought of as his friend. There are characters filling every page, reminiscent of Dickens and yet standing quite well on their own as well. A well written and enjoyable read.

View all my reviews
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Bridget Mattson on May 08, 2013 :
The Artful Dodger was, perhaps, an undervalued character. Not in Jack Dawkins. Oliver does not take center stage, which was charming. I thoroughly enjoyed this tale, from the opening scene on the return voyage to a city that threw him out, to the ending that I was extremely concerned would be too predictable and tame in order to achieve comfort but was pleasantly surprising. There are delightful supporting characters, interconnected story lines, threads that are reintroduced as the plot progresses and a re-imagining of a scruffy urchin that many of us thought we were familiar with. Enjoyable read.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: M.H. Dartos on April 24, 2013 :
Charlton Daines has with graceful aplomb crafted a masterful and winning tale, craftily adopting the tone, lingua franca and communal sin qua non of olde tyme London. The tale blips along quite naturally, all being of one with its Olive Twist beginnings as it swiftly toggles from Jack Dawkins in his natural "petty thief" state, to the new and improved Jack Dawkins who so smoothly acquaints and inserts himself into polite society. Naturally, it is only a matter of negligible time before Dawkins runs head on into his old cohort, Oliver Twist, who has cleanly moved in to and adopted the habits, manners, and air of upper crust society.

A world of seemingly impenetrable suspicions mars their first meeting. Oliver, who expresses to Jack, "Once a thief, always a thief," is understandably concerned about his old acquaintance's ability to shake his old persona. Jack, aka Artful Dodger, receives this pronouncement as a right hook to the head.

Here forward, the tale twists and turns and rises and falls on many incidental and ultimately incendiary developments, pushing Jack Dawkins to the outermost limits of his wily character and its permutations as a fierce internal struggle rages, leaving him unquestionably at odds with his scandalous actions as he moves deeper and deeper into a world he had only known antagonistically as the Artful Dodger, only to face it now head on with a susurrating, closely held hope that he may one day be fully accepted into this world, much like Pinocchio wishing ever so dearly to become a "real boy."

As rehabilitative efforts have been reported to have no appreciable effect on recidivism, the criminal justice system's efforts to rehabilitate offenders have failed. With hope springing eternal, Jack Dawkins proceeds with trilling trepidation, deeply haunted as he finds painful the truism "old habits die hard."

In this well-crafted saga, Daines has whipped up not only a study on criminology, but what may very well have been the continuing tale of the Artful Dodger had Dickens so chosen to pursue it to its logical conclusion. If the story of Oliver Twist has a lingering resonance with you, it is strongly recommended you read this indispensable work of Charlton Daines. Not only does it serve as worthy companion to its engendering tale of old world London, but it is a tale that Dickens himself would no doubt approve without compunction.

C.B. Smith, author of Love, Knuckles and Melody Genesis
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: M.H. Dartos on April 24, 2013 : (no rating)
Charlton Daines has with graceful aplomb crafted a masterful and winning tale, craftily adopting the tone, lingua franca and communal sin qua non of olde tyme London. The tale blips along quite naturally, all being of one with its Olive Twist beginnings as it swiftly toggles from Jack Dawkins in his natural "petty thief" state, to the new and improved Jack Dawkins who so smoothly acquaints and inserts himself into polite society. Naturally, it is only a matter of negligible time before Dawkins runs head on into his old cohort, Oliver Twist, who has cleanly moved in to and adopted the habits, manners, and air of upper crust society.

A world of seemingly impenetrable suspicions mars their first meeting. Oliver, who expresses to Jack, "Once a thief, always a thief," is understandably concerned about his old acquaintance's ability to shake his old persona. Jack, aka Artful Dodger, receives this pronouncement as a right hook to the head.

Here forward, the tale twists and turns and rises and falls on many incidental and ultimately incendiary developments, pushing Jack Dawkins to the outermost limits of his wily character and its permutations as a fierce internal struggle rages, leaving him unquestionably at odds with his scandalous actions as he moves deeper and deeper into a world he had only known antagonistically as the Artful Dodger, only to face it now head on with a susurrating, closely held hope that he may one day be fully accepted into this world, much like Pinocchio wishing ever so dearly to become a "real boy."

As rehabilitative efforts have been reported to have no appreciable effect on recidivism, the criminal justice system's efforts to rehabilitate offenders have failed. With hope springing eternal, Jack Dawkins proceeds with trilling trepidation, deeply haunted as he finds painful the truism "old habits die hard."

In this well-crafted saga, Daines has whipped up not only a study on criminology, but what may very well have been the continuing tale of the Artful Dodger had Dickens so chosen to pursue it to its logical conclusion. If the story of Oliver Twist has a lingering resonance with you, it is strongly recommended you read this indispensable work of Charlton Daines. Not only does it serve as worthy companion to its engendering tale of old world London, but it is a tale that Dickens himself would no doubt approve without compunction.

C.B. Smith, author of Love, Knuckles and Melody Genesis
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Kathy Davis on April 12, 2013 :
This book was given to me to provide an unbiased review on Goodreads.com by the author. Upon first reading that the character "the artful dodger" had been borrowed for the premise of this story, I thought, "what audacity", "what ambition"!. But. as soon as I began to read a few passages, I was impressed with the detail, the character development, and the authors' ability to to build upon the story of Oliver and Jack's relationship as grown men. In a brilliant portrayal of Jack's return to the "scene of the crime" years later as a story of the underbelly of pickpockets and thieves intertwine with the upper crust of society, I was reeled into the web of adventure and unable to stop reading until I had exhausted the very last word of this 132 page story. I applaud "Charlton Daines" for this work of art. I would boldly classify this Victorian, historical masterpiece in the same class as "Great Expectations", "Huck Finn" and of course "Oliver Twist". I believe Charles Dickens would be pleased to see his work embellished and expounded upon by this author. I look forward to the next literary undertaking by "Charles Daines". I rate this book a five-star plus...BRAVO...
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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