Tales by Erin

Rated 4.50/5 based on 2 reviews
A collection of short stories to capture a mix of emotions. - ISBN 9780980677614

Miss Fruitcake's Apple Blossom,
Caveman,
A C4 on the BW,
Growing Pains,
A Passing Moment,
A Further Moment,
Warrior Chick,
The Last Page. More
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Reviews

Review by: K.M. Herkes on Aug. 09, 2014 :
I liked this collection (a lot) and I recommend it, but don't expect diamonds.

What's inside the tin? A lovely variety of stories. First-person and third, characters young and old, placed in venues from Afghanistan to academia. Each tale is offered with a unique perspective and a refreshing clarity of voice. Every tale feels real and personal, despite the range of experiences and cultures presented. Some stories have twists, some don't, some meander along, some cut straight to the point, and all of them leave a vivid impression.

Why not five stars? The depth and breadth of the collection is ambitious, but the results sometimes fall short in execution. A short story about rape told from first-person that breezily glosses over the act itself? IT seemed...off, somehow. An entertaining slice-of-life story about a military mission got bogged down in jargon and repetition a few hundred words before it was done, although the wrap-up was excellent. Secondary characters tended towards sketchiness, and several stories contained vocabulary that that shook me out of immersion in the narrative flow; for example, the US has only lawyers, not solicitors. That story was explicitly set in the US, so...it jarred.

All that said, I would bump things up another half-star if the assorted odd italicizations, minimal grammar errors and the pesky vocabulary quirks got a polishing edit.
(review of free book)

Review by: Alex Canton-Dutari on Jan. 16, 2014 :
Tales by Erin by EA Harwik
Reviewed by Alex Canton-Dutari
I have always considered that writing short stories takes a special gift, which EA Harwik definitely has. Though the content of the stories are quite different, they are bound by emotion in all his different degrees -- from love to anger. When she writes in the first person she is able to elicit strong feelings in the reader, especially since her fiction almost reads as true life -- or is it the other way around? BTW, Caveman was delivered in a style reminiscent of a fable. This is an author I will follow.
(review of free book)

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