Walking the Talk: Engaging the Public to Build a Sustainable World

Rated 4.00/5 based on 1 reviews
W.B.Yeats' line that "The best lack all conviction, while the worst are filled with passionate intensity" could have been written to describe the public attitude towards climate change. _Walking the Talk_ argues that the traditional motivators of "faith" and "duty" have become debased coins, which limits public engagement. In exchange the author offers the ideal of "practical philosophy". More

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About Bill Hulet

Bill Hulet has spent a great deal of his life working on environmental and social justice issues. These have included organizing a rent strike, bioregional conferences, a local currency system, a slate of candidates for local municipal elections, organizing for the Green Parties of Ontario and Canada, suing Walmart, and many other projects.

At the same time, Bill has also pursued a spiritual path. He has studied under a wide range of religious teachers including Jesuits, Buddhist monks and Daoist priests. He also has a Master's degree in Western philosophy. He has also been initiated into a Daoist lineage.

As a writer, he published a weekly column on various issues in "The Guelph Mercury" and various free lance op-eds in various newspapers such as the Kitchener Waterloo Record and the Elmira Independent.

At the same time he pursued all these interests he also worked at the University of Guelph Library as a porter in the Facilities Services Department of the Chief Information Officer. He lives in a 100 year old house that has been gutted and retrofitted into a modern, energy efficient building, much of which he did himself. He is married to Michelle Harrison, who lives in St. Louis Missouri.

Reviews

Review by: Jeove on Oct. 08, 2014 :
This book provides a great insight into the challenges faced by a life-long activist. It is a journeyman work that is a bit short on polish, but has many good bits that resonate with me.
I could liken it to a lobster dinner in that, although it can take some work to get at all the meat, you end up with a satisfying meal at the end.
The author discusses sources of reluctance and resistance and plausible ways forward to engage people on climate change. For those of us who might otherwise succumb to despair regarding the destruction of the environment and the lack of outrage from people, it is a interesting reference work and a good tool for the activist' toolbox.
It took me some effort to read through the first time, in part because of my unfamiliarity with the content, but I intend to read through it again and likely again.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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