Rain

Rated 5.00/5 based on 2 reviews
A multigenerational family saga that chronicles the lives of three generations of the Wallin sawmilling dynasty. Rain spans four decades and crosses the globe. More

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About Leigh K Cunningham

Leigh K Cunningham is a lawyer with a career as a senior executive for a number of public companies in her home country of Australia. She has three master’s degrees in law (Master of International Trade & Investment Law) and commerce (Master of Commerce) and an MBA (International Management) where she graduated as ‘Top Student’.

Now a full-time writer, Leigh has won seven awards for her four titles with her latest title, BEING ANTI-SOCIAL chosen by IndieReader as one of the Best Indie Books for 2013. BEING ANTI-SOCIAL also won gold at the Readers' Favorite Book Awards (Chick-Lit) and gold at the Reader Views Literary Awards (Humor).

Leigh's other title for the adult fiction market, RAIN, won gold at the 2011 Indie Excellence Awards (Literary Fiction) and silver at the Independent Publisher Awards (IPPY) in the Regional Fiction: Australia/New Zealand category. RAIN was #1 on the Amazon bestseller list for Women’s Fiction.

THE GLASS TABLE and its sequel, SHARDS - Leigh's titles for the children's market, won silver medals at the Mom's Choice Awards (2010).

Leigh's next title, REWRITTEN is due for release in 2014.

Leigh is the founder and Executive Director for the Association of Independent Authors, a global membership organization advancing the interests of self-published authors.

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Melanie Walsh on June 16, 2012 :
Rain is at the top of my list of favourite books of the year. I've often found myself thinking of the characters while sitting on the train on my way to work. I love books that can make me feel for the characters and be in the moment with them rather than just reading and observing, and that's what this book did for me. It is however a very sad and tragic tale, so if you're looking for something upbeat, this is not the book for you.

The writer also has a unique writing style which is consistent with the genre (literary fiction), so again, if you don't like this kind of prose, this may not be the book for you.

I also really enjoyed the Australian setting and references.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Ron Fritsch on June 16, 2012 :
Rain, Leigh K. Cunningham's first novel for adult readers, is a page-turning story of three generations in a small-town Australian family during forty turbulent years from 1965 to 2005.

The tale mostly, but not exclusively, revolves around a second-generation mother, Helena, and her third-generation daughter, Carla. Even as they deny they need to, they give their lives to the men and boys who are their fathers, sons, brothers, and lovers—and receive in return enormous grief.

And yet this is no mindless indictment of the male characters. For instance, at the beginning Helena and her sister Grace, heiresses to their father's sawmill business, both favor the physically desirable Michael Baden. He readily returns the interest of the more attractive sister, Grace, to the point of consummating a youthful affair with her.

Grace, however, has her eye on a more glamorous life than Michael can be a part of. A worker in the mill, he's a bastard grandson of the impoverished and physically abused woman who claims to be his mother. He's also a victim of severe playground abuse for nothing more than being who he is.

When Grace leaves for a more worldly existence in Sydney, Michael turns his attention to the "sensible and comfortable" Helena. This reader finds it difficult to blame either of them for what follows.

Abuse—psychological, physical, and sexual—dominates Cunningham's story. And yet all of her characters—no matter how possible it is to say they invite their own grief—are sympathetic. This reader wanted each of them to succeed, even as he grew in his knowledge that most of them wouldn't.

The playground bullies and the gang-rapists of a fourteen-year-old girl in a nighttime cemetery are faceless, as they should be in this kind of story. Nobody has to be convinced those hobgoblins exist, even in fiction that blissfully—in this reader's humble opinion—eschews paranormality.

But what this reader most admires in Rain is Cunningham's unsentimental but intensely moving style of writing. She has no need to tell you when she's touching your heart. You simply feel it.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

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