The Traveler's Companion

Rated 4.17/5 based on 8 reviews
"The Traveler's Companion is a riveting psychological thriller, recommended." --Midwest Reviews
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"The Travelers Companion pulls the reader through the pages. It is tight well woven plot with many satisfying moments and a superb, poignant, ending."
--Read2Review.com
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"Solaris" meets "The Thomas Crown Affair." More

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About Christopher John Chater

Christopher John Chater is the author of the novels The Traveler's Companion, Omegasphere, and Aquarius Rising, as well as the award winning short story "Progenitor." He was born in Burbank, California, but he's lived all over, the East Coast, the West Coast, and the South. After working in several industries, a production assistant in the film industry, a song plugger in the music industry, and a bartender and butler in the hospitality industry, he started his own publishing company, Chater Publishing, in November of 2011. He now lives in Southern California and works full-time as a publisher and writer.

www.christopherjohnchater.blogspot.com

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Carolina Sanabria on Oct. 09, 2012 :
This book surprises me, I didn’t read any information about the book before starting to read it, and I love the science fiction of this book. Every character is profound and well constructed. The story, to my surprise, is really good and involving. I really recommend this book to the fans of science fiction even do the story is not center on the science around this fantastic new world.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Carolina Sanabria on Oct. 09, 2012 : (no rating)
This book surprises me, I didn’t read any information about the book before starting to read it, and I love the science fiction of this book. Every character is profound and well constructed. The story, to my surprise, is really good and involving. I really recommend this book to the fans of science fiction even do the story is not center on the science around this fantastic new world.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Australwind on June 24, 2012 :
I received The Traveler's Companion as a LibraryThing Member's Giveaway and it finally gave me some hope for the future of writing and self publishing! This was definitely the sort of complexity and depth I was looking for - a book that would have stood tall amongst its fellows on the shelf in a library or bookshop.

Each of the main characters was well developed, including the clone/robot Angela, to a level where you are invited to like or hate, trust or fear, engage with their internal struggles as they are played out on the page.

The science of this science fiction seemed well researched and presented in a manner that was not too complex nor distancing of the reader. I found the underlying theme of the power of love, grief and loss as untapped sources of human creativity within this "world" to be quite resonant especially given I am an artist. The concept that this power could be harnessed to replicate our world including those we love in another Zone is not too great a reach from the bounds of possibility and this therefore made the story a whole lot more accessible.

Nice work, Mr Chater.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

Review by: Elizabeth Miller on June 18, 2012 :
Decently written science fiction in the vein of Lem's Solaris. Some parts get a little long winded but iver all it is a nice way to spend an afternoon in the sun.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Wodke Hawkinson on Sep. 13, 2011 :
The Traveler's Companion by Christopher John Chater describes a future world where a CIA agent employs a human-like robot to get close to a man who has developed "The Zone", a place where thoughts create matter and people, although the people inside The Zone are thought to be ephemera, not actual humans. Without spoilers, it's hard to describe the eventual fate of these pseudo-humans, but The Zone is determined to be dangerous to reality.
This is a well-written novel that takes the reader on a philosophical journey as well as a literary one. The characters are full and believable and the world is convincing. Some of the concepts presented in the book are challenging to reason out, but your mind will work on them after you lay the book down. Mr. Chater is a talented writer and the book presents a unique view into the destructive potential that exists when people can have whatever they imagine. The question remains, can they have it without harming someone or something else? I would recommend this book.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Hannah Hummel on Sep. 05, 2011 :
This was a fantastic read! What happens when an alternate universe created by each specific individual is about to be released to the world? Especially after it is revealed that any length of time in "The Zone" causes insanity? Very exciting, well written. I loved it!
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: MrsFlicker on Aug. 20, 2011 : (no rating)
This novel effectively manipulates the science fiction genre. It plausibly combines known science with the futuristic idea of the relationship between man and machine. It uses the ideas and working theories of physics to present the human concept of loss, or rather, the power of loss to generate new creation. Chater writes, at the core, a story that explores the emotions that supreme loss can create. He depicts the determination to survive the overwhelming sense of defeat and lonliness that humans experience when loss is suffered. He does this against the backdrop of an explanation of the "what if" factor in life. This novel is an example of what science fiction can be when it is presented in its finest form--a well-written, well-told story.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

Review by: Christopher Kellen on Aug. 16, 2011 :
This was a very interesting novel; an exploration of the themes of love and loss via string theory and quantum physics.

At its core, this is a story about loss. Ryan Iverson's wife died of sudden brain cancer, and he has spent the following decades believing that love makes people stupid, enough that he can actually 'weaponize' it (per the book's description) via his "daughter" - a hybrid clone/AI named Angela.

The book really explores what it means to lose someone via the main plot device - an alternate dimension called the Zone, where human creativity becomes the path to godlike power, via the 'magic' of quantum physics. It is realized and described well enough that it is easy to suspend one's disbelief and accept the existence of the Zone for the course of the story.

The characters are well-defined and individual - Dr. Iverson, Angela, Director Gibbons and C.C. Go all have distinct personalities which shine through very clearly.

It has a powerful story at its heart. There is a bit too much exposition at times, when characters trade long-winded scientific theories framed by "You already know all this" or "As we all know"; a few minor editing mistakes and one odd formatting error (in the ePub version) where a quote from the titular "Traveler's Companion" starts with "Chapter One", which turned into its own chapter, complete with page breaks, immediately following the regular Chapter 3, slightly mar what is otherwise an enjoyable read.

All in all, a very strong entry by Mr. Chater. I sincerely hope he has more stories to share.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

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