PILL POP DOM

Adult
Rated 4.92/5 based on 13 reviews
Selected by the Brit Writers Awards, PILLPOPDOM has been called, 'a pill-popping Bridget Jones in a Spanish Lost in Translation' More
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Price: Free! USD

About Robert Coles

Born in 1970 I grew up in the Chilterns, first on a mobile home park then in an old country house in Dancers End, my own Buckinghamshire Narnia. Spending more time in hospital than behind a school desk, I struggled academically, and was told on my application to the sixth form that university was not for me. At seventeen I passed my first A level in Art, studied Law and Classical Civilisations and went on to do Social Anthropology at SOAS, London University. There I fell in love with foreign places and cultures. Since I hadn’t the means to go anywhere (in an era before student loans), travelling had to wait for my first real job besides licking envelopes for Lloyd’s, namely: TEFL teacher. So off I went to Indonesia to teach English and discover first-hand the joys of foreign abodes: amethyst waters, paddy fields ringing volcanic peaks, wildlife (scampering off with my lunch), wet heat, shanty towns, poverty (me included) and malaria. Later I went on to live in such places as Turkey, Japan, Azerbaijan, the USA, Libya and Spain. In all the years since I have never looked back and continue to be a global gypsy in a wide, wide world.

Reviews

Review by: Christina M. Grey on Aug. 18, 2011 :
As a shameful but self-aware pillpopper who is frequently relapsing into the world of psychopharmacological crutches, I loved this.
(review of free book)

Review by: Angelo Cann on July 06, 2011 :
Really funny, and you can't beat the price!
(review of free book)

Review by: Julie Le Baigue on May 10, 2011 :
In turns hilarious and heartwrenching, Pillpopdom is a vibrant rollercoaster of a read that takes you deep into the mind of self-medicating pharmacist Paul Stumbles, a bewildered Englishman abroad, as he makes his way in a weird and wonderful Madrid, after divorce and the death of his brother. Robert Coles has an flamboyantly original voice and I can't wait to read the rest of this brilliant novel.
(review of free book)

Review by: Liz FisherFrank on May 05, 2011 : (no rating)
What a start to a story. We meet Paul, a likeable nerd with sizeable needs. It soon becomes clear that, throughout his story, Paul will find himself in all sorts of deeply cringy situations making us glad he exists. The writing is fluent and funny whilst cleverly contrasting, in these first few chapters, the stiff upper lipped Brits as he departs the UK with the effusive Spainish as he lands in Spain at the start of his new life. I really look forward to reading the rest of it.
(review of free book)

Review by: Alban Bytyqi on May 03, 2011 :
Paul. What a beautiful name for a pharmacist. The opener reminds me of a T-shirt statement “Buy this man a beer”. Paul Stumbles needs a beer or a chill-pill, I thought.

It would perhaps prevent him from publicly stumbling into embarrassing situations, such as awkward video messages or winding up at Mogadishu International.

The story is beautifully written. Throughout the chapters there are lots of theatrical images. Reading made me think about how meanings change beyond our comprehension.

I thoroughly enjoyed it. Look forward to having my copy signed.
(review of free book)

Review by: Michael Michael on April 17, 2011 :
Paul Stumbles leaves England for a life in Spain after losing his wife to another man. His wife is still sending him video messages of her sexual exploits with her new partner. The only reprieve from his woes comes in the form of a magic anti-depressant he is slowly getting hooked on.

The humor kept me tearing through the excellent first three chapters, but it is the underlying poignant theme that has left an impression that will stay with me long after. I can not wait to read this book.
(review of free book)
(review of free book)

Review by: Paddy Tyrrell on April 17, 2011 :
Rich in imagery, the first three chapters of Robert Coles' Pillpopdom take us on a journey into the colourful world of Paul Stumbles.

Strong visual descriptions mingle with sharp observation as Paul stumbles his way into a new life in Spain. Robert Coles demonstrates a commendable ability to express feeling and emotions that range from the happiness of:
"To hold that slip of paper in my covetous palm was like being touched by an angel."
to the drab heaviness of depression:
"It felt like the whole world had switched back to black-and-white telly."

By adding to the mix good dialogue and idiosyncratic humour, the author has created a memorable character and takes the reader with him as he experiences a new, challenging and funny world. I look forward to reading more.
(review of free book)

Review by: R Heald on April 17, 2011 :
The first three chapters of Pillpopdom kept me engrossed until the final letter on the final page and I look forward to reading more. Amongst the belly-laughs there are painfully accurate observations about human relationships and addiction. Following Paul on his energetic, whirlwind journey from Luton airport to an exciting but unfamiliar life in Spain was a real pleasure, and I can’t wait to find out what happens next.
(review of free book)

Review by: The Reddleman on April 15, 2011 :
PILLPOPDOM by Robert F Coles ... Reviewed by Stephen Regan

Here is a startled-by-the-oddness-of-the-world journey by a pharmaceutically needy (and knowledgeable) man who leaves behind grey old England with its lardy food, lousy weather and dull parents.

Paul Stumbles leaves with a big smile and a ONE WAY TICKET to Spain. Escape – hurrah!

The journey is out is weird. Graphic images of sexual athletics by his ex-wife are sent digitally to him aboard the plane causing, well, all sorts of oddness, including a big mood swing, but that’s soon put right by pill-popping.

Paul’s new life starts with colour, late lunches, sensuality, vibrancy and the memory of his dead brother – then it gets stranger and stranger. Our man has a knack of doing, saying the wrong thing socially, which seems to be even more of a problem now he’s in Spain, where they do things differently.

Robert Coles tells this tale with stylistically enhanced and rather poetic flair. You get into Mr Stumbles’ head, which is extraordinary territory.

You are by turns amused, concerned and amazed by the way Paul slides and slithers into the local culture after taking up residence in the apartment left by his brother in Madrid. There is misunderstanding; there is paranoia; there is the drug-enhanced discomfort of an Englishman abroad.

Take a ONE WAY TICKET to this beguiling world. Escape.
(review of free book)

Review by: Roberta Williams on April 13, 2011 :
I loved reading this novel. It's so quirky and original. Such a shame there's only three chapters. Paul is so like my other half I could be married to him.
(review of free book)

Review by: Leanne Meredith on April 12, 2011 :
I just finished reading the first three chapters of Robert Coles Pillpopdom It's hilarious--and really cleverly written. The scene in the student digs with the tripped out gerbil and that sentence--“No answer. Not a peep out of him. That was to be expected however, he’d nodded off”--had me giggling out loud. Good one! Selected by the Brit Writers Awards, Pillpopdom has been called, 'a pill-popping Bridget Jones in a Spanish Lost in Translation' and it lives up to expectation. Looking forward to reading the whole thing. :)
(review of free book)

Review by: Terry Atkin on April 12, 2011 :
I read this with some trepidation, surmising that it would trivialise depression, which is a medical condition that many people like myself suffer. Instead I found myself touched. There's a lot more to this novel that its humour, bright colours and giddy tone.
(review of free book)

Review by: Daniel Rodriguez on April 10, 2011 :
Zany and hilarious. This is a roller coaster of a read. One moment you're thinking OMG and the next you're LOL, laughing out loud. I don't know what pills the guy who wrote this was on but I'd like some.
(review of free book)

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