Two Matadors

Adult
Rated 4.67/5 based on 3 reviews
At his home in Sevilla, Spain, aged matador Antonio Castañeda de Castilla tells of his life, a story of love and betrayal, danger and deception, honor and shame,determinism and destiny, happiness and heartache, but more than all,it is a story about living life with passion! More

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Reviews

Review by: Scott Skipper on July 31, 2012 :
Brilliant!

Antonio Castañeda de Castilla knows everything there is to know about bulls and women. As had been foretold by his gypsy wife, he meets a young American in the bull ring at Sevilla who he persuades—with copious amounts of rare wine—to record his biography. In the course of one night the old matador relates to his mesmerized chronicler the story of a remarkable life—a life of love lost, regained and lost again. He tells of a life brimming with lust, danger, and circuitous twists of fate and faith. Antonio is a twin, an indomitable spirit, a hero, a betrayer, a victim, an adventurer and a tireless voluptuary.

This story has shades of Death in the Afternoon, Prince and the Pauper, and Amor en el Tiempo de Colera. Marcus McGee's prose is phenomenal. I was hooked in the first paragraph.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: rvpapa on Oct. 20, 2011 :
This book is yet another example of the depth and breadth of Marcus McGee’s imagination, knowledge and storytelling skill. The matador's imparting of his words of wisdom on life and love (in a manner that reminds me of Kahlil Gibran's "The Prophet"), and the deception-laden Greek tragedy-like storyline are cleverly combined to make this a very interesting read. How does he think up this stuff?
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: rvpapa on Oct. 20, 2011 :
This book is yet another example of the depth and breadth of Marcus McGee’s imagination, knowledge and storytelling skill. The matador's imparting of his words of wisdom on life and love (in a manner that reminds me of Kahlil Gibran's "The Prophet"), and the deception-laden Greek tragedy-like storyline are cleverly combined to make this a very interesting read. How does he think up this stuff?
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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