77 Days in September

Rated 4.73/5 based on 11 reviews
After terrorists successfully launch an EMP attack against the United States Kyle Tait finds himself stranded 2,000 miles from home in a country that, from a technological standpoint, has been completely crippled. Braving starvation, violence and the threat of the unknown, Kyle sets off on a journey to return to a family who might not have even survived the attack. More

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Reviews

Review by: resonant on Jan. 01, 2014 :
Plausible, with no technical errors that I could detect. The emotional letters were a bit overdone, but reasonable and necessary for the story (without strong emotion, there would be no reason to rush back immediately).
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Heather Cimuchowski on June 27, 2012 :
A scary portrayal of our possible future if terrorists were to attack with an EMP. It is hard for us to imagine what would happen to this country should an EMP attack occur, but Ray Gorham does a good job of it here. It is just scary how many of us would be so unprepared for this – it makes me want to go out and make sure I have a stockpile of food and water just in case…though I haven’t yet. And even more so, make sure our garden is up and running as well. But even then, it is scary how quickly some people will just turn away or even hurt others in order for them to survive.

The story was also a very sweet love story and what one man will do in order to make it back to his wife and children. It definitely had me tearing up!

I gave this book 4 STARS because it certainly struck a chord with me, and I was completely interested in the story. It is definitely worth a read. I’m going to pass it on to my husband now to see what he thinks!
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Shandy Jo on June 10, 2012 :
The biggest thing that got me about this book was it could happen. That thought kept filtering through my mind as I read 77 Days in September. I had to wonder would my family survive something like that. I even fell asleep reading this one night and had a nightmare about it. Although that probably wasn't the authors intention.

As you can probably tell it was very enthralling, as I got farther into the book the harder it became to put it down. Mr Gorham shows all the aspects of human behavior. From the kindness of strangers to those that prey on anyone they perceive to be weaker than themselves. Kyle's love and dedication for his wife and family is inspiring. I had to keep reading to find out if he would make it and if Jennifer, his wife, plus his kids would survive. Just adapting to the world without electricity was a story in itself, add to that Kyle's journey from Texas to Montana on foot. Which was emotionally and physically draining for him, as well as highly dangerous.

Jennifer must face raising three kids without the luxuries of electricity, running water and phones. Most of all the security of knowing where her husband is and if he's ok. Seeing their community come together as well as what people do when faced with just surviving was interesting. I feel Mr Gorham did a really good job making this book realistic. The characters could have been your neighbor or any regular old Joe you meet on the street. Everything worked together to make this a very good and interesting book.
Received a copy of book from the author.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Bob Milne on June 07, 2012 :
I've always been a huge fan of end-of-the-world, apocalyptic thrillers. I'd like to say that Stephen King's The Stand is responsible, but it's actually Isaac Asimov's The Last Man on Earth anthology that sticks in my head as my first exposure to the subject. In fact, I still have the tattered old paperback sitting on my shelf today!

Anyway, I've read a lot of apocalyptic tales over the years, some of which I've quite enjoyed, and others which have fallen flat. Generally, I find that I tend to be drawn more to the 'epic' stories, the massive doorstoppers that explore every aspect of the disaster. However, the stories that often work the best, the ones that resonate the strongest and stick with me the longest, are the more intimate tales.

That the niche into which Ray Gorham's 77 Days in September falls. It starts with an 'epic' feel, bouncing around between characters and settings, but only to establish the facts of what's happening . . . and to remove all doubt as to the scope of what's happened. The story really gets going with a plane crash that rivals just about anything on screen in terms of excitement and drama. It's set up nicely, making us care about the characters involved, and then is played out extremely well.

Once we get beyond the plane crash, however, our scope slowly begins to narrow until we really get to the heart of the novel - Kyle's long walk home (across a hostile, desolate America) and his wife's struggle to believe in his return (in a small town with its own hostilities). It's a story telling device that works particularly well, allowing us to follow that most intimate of tales, the struggle for one man's survival against the most overwhelming odds, while at the same time granting us some perspective on the overall situation, through a small-town microcosm of America.

Kyle and Jennifer are both well-developed characters, loving spouses who are suddenly confronted with a physical separation that mirrors their emotional distance of the last few years. Neither knows whether the other is truly alive, and both are faced with temptations throughout their ordeal. Even if Kyle does reveal a few personality flaws along the way, it's entirely unrealistic to expect anybody to be a candidate for sainthood after having spent months walking across the country. The subplot of Jennifer's stalker is, perhaps, a bit too typical of the genre, but it's handled well . . . and sets up a final resolution that really puts the emotional cap on the story.

If I had one complaint about the novel, it's the way in which the political sub-plot seems to just fade away. There's a significant focus early on around one US Senator that seemed to have some potential, but just when I thought she was being left behind like the other victims, she resurfaces for an oddly-placed scene, only to be forgotten again - this time for good. I would have liked to see more of her story, or else not go back to her at all that last time, but it's my only real quibble.

This was an exciting, fast-paced, nicely detailed story. Gorham never goes over-the-top in his descriptions of the horrors and the gore, which makes the darker elements all the more effective. He balances the emotions of the situation well, contrasting fear with courage, despair with hope, and animal lust with human love. The few human interactions Kyle encounters on his journey are nicely balanced as well, driving home the fact that the odds are truly against him, but also recognizing the fact that there are good people in any situation.

Definitely recommended.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Rachel Simons on May 09, 2012 :
77 Says in September was a very interesting book from the very start as it is something that could happen whether it be in America or any other continent, the effects would be devastating for the continent and the people. The book didn’t drag on for pages on end before anything happened it started straight away.

It was very inspiring with Kyle walking 2,000 miles home to his beloved family, and tried to survive the distance, the hostility of people who would do anything to stay alive and on the brink of death several times. I was cheering Kyle on throughout his trek through the states to get back to his family where he hoped they would still be alive and not starved to death.

I really enjoyed the book, it was very well written and was gripping.

I was telling my husband everything that was happening and he said it sounded like a great read for the fact that an EMP is not fantasy. People should be aware of what effects it could have to the human race.

A Brilliant book, a pleasure to read and would recommend it to everyone.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Teressa Morris on May 03, 2012 :
My previous experience with survival or "doomsday" fiction was Stephen King's The Stand and David Brin's The Postman. I've also seen the Mad Max movies, The Book of Eli, and The Road. I tend to appreciate the stories that tend more to the redemptive nature of humanity rather than the ones that focus on our baser sides.

In this uncertain world (especially my uncertain world) I found it very difficult to read this book. My life sucks enough right now without worrying about terrorist attacks or EMPs or the Mayan prophecies or the zombie apocalypse. Seriously. But as a piece of fiction, this is an awesome read. Alternately thrilling and touching, I got so caught up in the story of Kyle's struggle to return to his family that I could barely put the book down.

This is a book that will make you think - beyond "am I prepared?" although that thought will definitely cross your mind, but also 'what am I willing to do to survive?" and "how far am I willing to go to help a stranger?"

If you enjoy survival fiction or you just need to restore your faith in the resilience of the human spirit, then I highly recommend this book!!
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Teressa Morris on May 03, 2012 :
My previous experience with survival or "doomsday" fiction was Stephen King's The Stand and David Brin's The Postman. I've also seen the Mad Max movies, The Book of Eli, and The Road. I tend to appreciate the stories that tend more to the redemptive nature of humanity rather than the ones that focus on our baser sides.

In this uncertain world (especially my uncertain world) I found it very difficult to read this book. My life sucks enough right now without worrying about terrorist attacks or EMPs or the Mayan prophecies or the zombie apocalypse. Seriously. But as a piece of fiction, this is an awesome read. Alternately thrilling and touching, I got so caught up in the story of Kyle's struggle to return to his family that I could barely put the book down.

This is a book that will make you think - beyond "am I prepared?" although that thought will definitely cross your mind, but also 'what am I willing to do to survive?" and "how far am I willing to go to help a stranger?"

If you enjoy survival fiction or you just need to restore your faith in the resilience of the human spirit, then I highly recommend this book!!
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: joanne held on March 25, 2012 :
Great story and very well written! I experienced so many emotions. It was great!! About 1/2 way through the book I mentioned to my husband about the book and then he pushed me to finish it so he could start it! He is about 1/2 done now and loving it!
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Anthony Wessel on Feb. 09, 2012 :
An Excellent Post Apocalyptic Novel Without The End Of Mankind.

77 Days in September by Ray Gorham receives a rating of 4.6 stars (rounded to 5 stars) from this book reviewer.

77 Days in September is an excellent post apocalyptic novel. Don’t be scared away because of this topic. It is a great story of survival, dedication to family, love, plus it is not the “end of the mankind”. This book kept my interest from the beginning until the end.

Overall an excellent book and deserving of its current rating of 4.6 stars on 84 reviews. I would recommend this book for both men and women. Go ahead and buy this book for $3.99 for your Kindle. It is a great read.

Anthony Wessel - Owner of DigitalBookToday.com and reviewer at KindleBookReview.com.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Stephanie BeautyBrite.com on Jan. 31, 2012 :
Have you ever read a book and the story just sticks with you when you aren’t reading it and even after you finished it? I found 77 Days in September to be just that. My eyes have been opened.

I wasn’t sure what to expect with 77 Days in September as I have never heard of EMPs. About one third of the way into the book, I told my husband about it. I told him that I am reading a book about a terrorist attack, the terrorists use a nuclear bomb 300 feet in the air. My husband knew exactly what I was referring to.

While 77 Days in September is fiction, I believe it is very much a possibility. I want my family to be prepared, especially after reading this book.

How far would you go to be reunited with your family? What are you willing to endure just to see your family again?

Follow Kyle Tait on the journey of his life to reunite with his family. Jennifer Tait is caring their three children while trying to protect them and herself. They are forced to tackle their own obstacles on their own. Kyle finds the occasional help while on trek and Jennifer has their neighbors to confide in.

This book is about family, love, life, and tears. Not only will you get lost in this book, it will definitely make you appreciate your family.
(reviewed within a week of purchase)

Review by: Stanton Macfarlane on Jan. 25, 2012 :
Good story, good characters. In a lot of ways, the story wrote itself - which is my way of saying that the story unfolded much as you would expect. That isn't to say it is predictable. It means that the events seemed real. It seemed everything that happened was how you might expect things might actually happen in such a scenario. You don't have to suspend disbelief, you can get caught up in the story without having to remind yourself that it's only make believe.

Great first effort, I recommend this book to everyone.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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