The Tale of the Landlady's Mirror

Rated 3.50/5 based on 4 reviews
"The mirror caught Jane's eye almost immediately. Jane gazed into it, intent. Her reflection was slightly clouded, slightly misty, the harsh lines and angles on her face smoothed out. It was as though there was a layer of fine, gauzy gas between the glass and the silver and it was beautiful."

A middle-aged landlady finds a mirror in the local dump, where nothing is as it seems. More
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Price: Free! USD

Words: 1,710
Language: English
ISBN: 9781465894571
About Iain Brown

Born on Merseyside in 1979, Iain Brown grew up in the East Midlands of England. Vastly over-educated in theoretical physics, he embarked on a research career focusing on the most interesting and least fashionable areas of cosmology. Guitarist, songwriter, sound engineer, author, digital artist, obsessed with mediaeval history and absurdly egotistical, he set up Killing Vector as a creative outlet in 2011. The marque will feature a range of fiction and music from short stories to serial novels, albums and compendia, all released on a loose, flexible schedule through a range of online outlets, currently including Smashwords, Amazon and Lulu.

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Reviews

Review by: Red Jackson on Jan. 19, 2013 :
Interesting idea but not a very exciting story. An "antique shop" would be a better setting than the "local dump". This reads more like a description of events than a short story. Good thing for the notes so I could figure out what was being alluded to.
(review of free book)

Review by: a lane on Feb. 18, 2012 :
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(review of free book)

Review by: a lane on Feb. 18, 2012 :
I really liked this. I felt it had a poignancy about it. Who wouldn't want to appear younger? A mirror like that could be very addictive, especially if you were unhappy with your lot in life. It reminded me of The Picture of Dorian Gray, but in reverse. A person growing older yet appearing younger in the mirror, instead of the person staying youthful-looking while the painting gets uglier to reflect the 'inner' person.
I have to say, the narrative came to an abrupt stop which I didn't forsee, BUT I think that's because I was enjoying my own imagination whilst reading...what was going to happen next...hiow far would/could this go?...
I can understand the reasoning behind it stopping when it did, although I think I would have enjoyed reading more...
Very interesting idea.
(review of free book)

Review by: Ernest Winchester on June 26, 2011 :
Very elegantly written. But a very confusing ending. What was supposed to have happened?
(review of free book)

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