Afterthoughts

Rated 5.00/5 based on 1 reviews
A collection of poetry from a heart broken, desrtroyed and renewed by grace. More
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Price: Free! USD

Words: 5,130
Language: English
ISBN: 9781466172364
About Sasha Pruett

I've been writing since I was eight, but it didn't sink in that writing was my future until I was nineteen. Since then I've written treatments for over one hundred books in nearly every genre. My first completed novel, Costly Obsession: Animalize the first book of the Costly Obsession trilogy, was released at the beginning of 2011 and book two, Costly Obsession: Decay, has just been released. When not writing or taking care of my little domestic zoo, I enjoy painting and playing music. My biggest fan is my amazing husband of nineteen years, but that's only fair since I'm his biggest fan too.

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Reviews

Review by: Margarete Schulz on Sep. 04, 2011 :
Sad and touching, but at times happy and full of hope. A wonderful collection of emotional poems. My only qualm -- and it's not really, strictly a "qualm", per se -- is that I don't believe you have to have religion to have spirituality, to feel a part of the universe and valued, valuable and needed by the rest of the world: you just have to be you. A lot of the poems are very sad and I think the thing you have to remember when you read them is that they are to make you think. Merely because others don't -- or have trouble showing -- that they care (or even love) you, doesn't mean that you aren't loved: you should always love yourself enough to care what happens to you and how your actions reverberate through the world and the people/living beings that you interact with. Loving yourself doesn't have to mean you're "in love" with yourself, but you've got to acknowledge yourself and realise that just because it's coming from you, that doesn't make it okay if the sentiment is meant to hurt and debilitate. Life and the very act of living and feeling can hurt, but not all pain has to be destructive, debilitating pain. And if no one else cares for you, or you feel that they don't, then it's not because you shouldn't be cared for -- you should always care for yourself -- and the future is a mystery. Anything can happen. Even change. You may, in the most unlikely moment, meet someone you can really care for and who really cares for you. You are never alone in the world. If you are alive, you are a part of all Life and the physical things and processes that facilitate life. In life, I think tolerance has to be one of your best assets. Tolerance allows you to learn and love, not matter what anyone else tells you. Everything you feel inside is real for you; it's real. It's saying something to you -- someone or something is saying something to you, either you or someone you know and think about, in the front or the back of your mind. Your feelings matter. Why, then, wouldn't anyone else's? You don't have to be alone in this world -- you aren't alone!
These poems made me think about something I don't think about a whole lot -- the way some people relate to the world and how, even though they might have many labels for themselves that are different to the labels others appoint themselves still, we are all basically the same, in a good way. We all have emotions and we all deal with them and handle them in different, but sometimes quite similar ways, and we all need recognition, love, safety and to live and, ideally, to learn and go on learning our whole lives (which, in truth, we do, though we may not realise). We sometimes build up walls that tell us we're different, but they're both real and unreal in varying degrees. And sometimes, the walls are for different reasons; why we label ourselves "different" is for different reasons. A way to separate ourselves from others, maybe to shield ourselves from emotional hurt and pain, but also, sometimes, to allow ourselves to feel as though we have something meaningful in our lives that we clutch onto and which sometimes ends up stilting us, too, not allowing us to see the good that we could allow into our lives by perhaps opening our minds and allowing ourselves to connect again. Life isn't always going to be glorious and joyous, but we don't have to be unhappy just because we're not "happy". Emotions are more complex than that, really, and are constantly unfolding in various shades and lights and aspects, affected by our present, future and past, as well as everyone that we know, interact with and know, hear, or read about, or even dream or someone merely from our imaginations.
Tolerance allows us to live our lives to the fullest extent and also to connect more fully. It can be a really great thing; for you, and for those around you. I think these poems are trying to point out how life can be dulled and how you can hurt yourself very badly if you don't love yourself and if you don't allow yourself to accept the past as the past and take your lesson from it and move on. And I also feel that it strongly encourages tolerance between people to foster better relationships (and understanding in relationships), whether they be romantic or not.
I am not a religious person, myself, but I am of the belief that if it makes you a better person and allows you to enjoy your life more fully and be more aware of yourself as an individual as well as one living in a community, as a part of the world, go with it -- certainly! But we don't just have one form of belief in our lives, we have many, many, and as we go on learning and living, and reflecting on our lives, we may alter our beliefs, but that doesn't make what we believe in or believed in any less important to our life's journey.
Ah... such a long review! If you find it tedious, reading it all (on a computer screen, no less!), I'll understand. Basically, I quite liked the poems. :) I know I could have brought that same thing across in less words, but a fair portion of the poems evoked such downheartedness that I just had to go off on a tangent and ramble. I know I've felt quite downheartened, myself, at times, but life isn't only about hurt and hurting. It's also about connecting with the world and with others and with ourselves (and getting to know ourselves better through our interactions with the world), and finding joy in life. Life is sadness, but also happiness: living is to have feelings. I guess that's all I meant to say. I don't know you, the author, and I might not know any of your readers (past, present or future), but I do know we're all in this world together.
Yeah, well, that's me -- rambled on enough. Shall stop now. :)
(review of free book)

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