How to Write Hot Sex: Tips from Multi-Published Erotic Romance Authors

Rated 5.00/5 based on 4 reviews
How to Write Hot Sex: Tips from Multi-Published Erotic Romance Authors features everything you need to know about adding sizzling sexual tension, scorching sex scenes, and emotional impact to your romance writing in twelve info-packed essays from bestselling and multi-published authors - so you can get published and get paid. More

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Words: 40,330
Language: English
ISBN: 9781466097285
About Shoshanna Evers

New York Times and USA Today Bestselling author Shoshanna Evers has written dozens of sexy stories, including The Man Who Holds the Whip (part of the bestselling MAKE ME anthology), Overheated, The Enslaved Trilogy, and The Pulse Trilogy (from Simon & Schuster Pocket Star).

Her work has been featured in Best Bondage Erotica 2012 and Best Bondage Erotica 2013, the Penguin/Berkley Heat anthology Agony/Ecstasy, and numerous erotic BDSM novellas including Chastity Belt and Punishing the Art Thief from Ellora’s Cave Publishing.

The non-fiction anthology Shoshanna Evers edited and contributed to, How To Write Hot Sex: Tips from Multi-Published Erotic Romance Authors, is a #1 Bestseller in the Authorship, Erotica Writing Reference, and Romance Writing categories.

Shoshanna is also the cofounder of SelfPubBookCovers.com, the largest selection of one-of-a-kind, premade book covers in the world.

Shoshanna is a New York native who now lives with her family and two big dogs in Northern Idaho. She welcomes emails from readers and writers, and loves to interact on Twitter and Facebook.

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Reviews

Review by: Jade Onyx on May 31, 2014 :
This is a wonderful reference book for erotica writers of all heats. Even if you aren't a romance writer, you can benefit from this reference.

Cara McKenna's "Real Ugly" expands on descriptions. Don't just describe coffee as "coffee." Instead, wouldn't you want a sip of that triple-shot espresso with vanilla whip cream and shaved dark chocolate bits sprinkled on top?

Desiree Holt's "Five Sexy Senses to Rev Up Scenes" pounds into us to engage our readers with all their senses--draw them into the story by elaborating on these details.

Christine d'Abo's "Boys Will Be Boys" tells us terms that boys use with boys. I learned what a twink was, for example, and resolved to read some M/M romances to research more guy terminologies. If you're not a guy, do your research so that you can write a convincing guy's POV.

L.K. Below's "Law of Attraction" details the connection that builds between two characters. This is crucial for any kind of relationship you are writing about--romance, friendship, etc.

Kate Douglas's "Writing the Fine Line Between Erotica and Porn" points out the differences between emotionless, plotless sex (porn) and a sex scene that actually moves the story forward. If you want your readers to remember your characters, then definitely write those steamy scenes with the plot in mind.

Giselle Renarde's "How to Write Convincing Fetish and Niche Market Sex" beseeches the reader-writer to really do the research required to convince our audiences of the authenticity of our characters. What could be worse than a reader picking up one of our books and crossing us off their list for inauthentic characterization?

Charlotte Stein's "Sexy Sentences" illustrates different ways to edit our own work to quicken the pace, deepen the connection, and up the heat level. I literally crossed out two of the three times the word "shoulder" appeared in one of my three-sentence paragraphs when I went back to read my first draft.

Isabo Kelly's "Fighting Sex" is a prime example of what's possible in succinct writing, when you're successful in weaving emotion, choreography, and character in a scene.

Delphine Dryden's "So You Think You Can Kink?" elaborates about the BDSM world and how to have believable characters, scenes, etc.

Jean Johnson's "Biology: The Good, The Bad, & the Sex Scene" explains the differences in arousal peaks in both sexes--important when writing believable sex scenes.

Cari Quinn's "Rx for a Saggy Love Scene" emphasizes the small stuff, the dirty talk, the internal thoughts and emotions. Quite useful for deep POV writing.

Finally, Shoshanna Evers' "Getting Published" gives newbie authors seeking traditional publishing the comprehensive basics of that industry and more. The more refers to tips that indie authors may also find helpful.

Overall, I highly recommend this book, which is a great resource for any writer but most specifically those who strive to write erotic fiction.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: Mark Desires on June 07, 2012 :
This book has been completely informational at describing how to write erotica, covering facts most people tend to overlook. I recommend it highly.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Shixah on Nov. 18, 2011 :
As an experienced author I rarely encounter a book that teaches me something new, let alone many somethings new. This book is an excellent resource written in practical, lay terms and is a MUST READ for authors, experienced and new alike.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Jean Johnson on Oct. 11, 2011 :
This book has all the things I needed to know back when I first started writing smut, but was too ignorant and clueless about. I did eventually figure everything out on my own, and am now writing bestselling erotic romances...but I wish we'd had this book available when I was younger! That's why I was honored when Shoshanna asked me to contribute an article--in fact, I've even learned one or two new tricks, just from reading the other contributers' suggestions! Who says you can't teach an experienced diva new tricks?
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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