Interview with Stephen Brown

What is the greatest joy of writing for you?
To unleash the power of the imagination! Sometimes (depending on the type of book) there may be something in particular I wish to express, an issue to hop up onto my soapbox about, but more often it is the sheer joy of creativity. The act of putting the imagery I have in my mind into words so that other people will be able to see and sense the same thing
What are you working on next?
A couple of novels based in a fantasy world I am in the process of fleshing out, and also a couple of Sci-fi ideas, one of which at least is a space detective story. I tend to have loads of projects on the go at any given time until, at a certain point, I've reached that moment when I must dive into one of them exclusively until it is finished.
Who are your favorite authors?
Douglas Adams, HP Lovecraft, Carlos Castaneda, Robert Rankin, Jamie Sams, Dan Abnett, Osho (not really an author, I know...), Kahlil Gibram, John Irving, Isaac Asimov, Frank Herbert, Philip K Dick and so very many more
What inspires you to get out of bed each day?
The Sun and the Sea, Love and Tea
When you're not writing, how do you spend your time?
Painting, photography, exploring the world with a (very small) backpack, being with my animals, talking toot with strangers and lounging on the beach whenever possible
Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I have been lucky enough to have lived all over the world (well, nearly!) - my childhood was spent in the Seychelles, Gambia, Vanuatu, Birmingham (?) and Lincoln in the UK, and I visited many, many more countries in the process (and afterwards). I think it has influenced my writing tremendously by giving me first hand experiences of so many different places, people & cultures, opening my eyes to so many different lives.
Also, given the freedom of my schooling, my thoughts and imagination were never boxed in or crushed in any way
What motivated you to become an indie author?
The sheer and hostile face of the traditional publishing industry.
It is so difficult even to get asked to send an example of your work to an agency, never mind a publisher. Still, 'hard' would be fine if only you could be sure you were on a level playing field, but unfortunately the publishing industry is rife with cheats and con-artists, so even if you do get accepted, you might find that the agencies who seem so interested are actually fake, and in the end start asking for money - an evolution of the Vanity Publishers. This has happened to me a couple of times.
A "no" is a no - that would be fine. Anything creative is subjective and you shouldn't take anything personally - but to be told "yes," to finally start dreaming and thinking you have maybe made it at last, only to find out months down the line it was all just a lie... That's a whole lot of work for nothing and so the possibility of publishing like this becomes much more attractive
What is your writing process?
I always have ten million ideas buzzing round my head, and whenever a new one pops in I try and write it down. Now I'm all computerised I put them in the files I think best suits them, but I still swap and change if I need to. Before I had thousands of scraps of paper here, there and everywhere. I still use paper and pens for planning, but do most of my work on the comp now. For Bread & McRoots I cut random pictures out of newspapers and magazines (anything I found interesting) and eventually tried to link them all together.
Sometimes a solid idea is already there, but more often than not I don't know quite where the story will go until it actually gets there. For my first three novels I wrote sequentially, starting at page one and going on till the end, but with these new ones I'm writing them a scence at a time from all over the story, and will stitch them together as the whole begins to take place. This helps tremendously if I find myself getting bogged down by a particular part of the story - I just move on to something else and come back to it fresh.
I guess I'll continue using different methods as and when I need to. It's adds to the creative challenge!
How do you approach cover design?
As the story comes along I begin to get a clear picture in my mind of what I want, and I then sketch out as many of the ideas as I can. The end result is then tempered by numerous other factors, mainly the photos I have in my collection and my skill with photoshop!

For a couple of covers I have put two or three options on facebook and then asked my friends to vote. This gives a pretty good idea of how well a cover is perceived by 'the public' and also generates a bit of interest within my immediate circles
Describe your desk
The actual desk varies, as I write in all manner of places! Minimum requirements are: a pad of paper, my netbook and the latest plan of the book, usually covered with a madman's scribbles and annotations! For my fantasy stories I also have a map and a little notebook filled with background notes for the world in general.
Other than that, I like a bit of incense, sometimes some music and always, always solitude - personally I find it very difficult when somebody else is around. That's why just lately I have found myself comfortably sprawled on a couple of bales inside my hand-built haybarn, surrounded only by the cat, ducks, chickens and horses wandering about to and fro. Ahh, bliss...
What do your fans mean to you?
As soon as I get one I'll let you know!

When somebody reads anything I've done I feel immensely flattered, and of course pleased to hear if they enjoyed it! I do love to hear from people and always welcome comments in whatever shape or form!
Published 2013-09-07.
Smashwords Interviews are created by the profiled author, publisher or reader.

Books by This Author

The Way of Ghee
By
Price: Free! Words: 8,930. Language: English. Published: August 16, 2013. Category: Fiction » Themes & motifs » Spiritual & metaphysical
One man’s spiritual quest leads him to a mysterious guru high up in the Himalayas, a man who is rumoured to be able to show the way to Enlightenment - but only to those who are ready to embrace it. A short story.
Corazon
By
Series: The Cripplesby Diaries, Book 3. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 129,920. Language: English. Published: July 3, 2013. Category: Fiction » Adventure » General
Why would a gang of poachers rip the hearts out of one animal from every continent and take them all to Mexico? Geeza Vermies badly wants to find out and, teaming up with Elliot again, is right behind them! But stumbling into a plot to bring back the Aztec Gods wasn’t part of the plan – was it? And what on earth is Father Sadfael doing there? It’s all looking set to get messy, down Mexico way!
McRoots
By
Series: The Cripplesby Diaries, Book 2. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 92,790. Language: English. Published: June 18, 2013. Category: Fiction » Adventure » General
Somewhere in Africa an age-old demon is stirring, and if it is not stopped a wave of hate and destruction will engulf us all. Step forward Elliot and Geeza! In an epic plot, our heroes must contend with mystifying hieroglyphs, pumpkin-headed goons, hairy black caterpillars, aliens, sunburn and so much more! Can they save the World? And what’s all this about the pyramids being built by Scotsmen...?
Bread
By
Series: The Cripplesby Diaries, Book 1. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 84,230. Language: English. Published: June 16, 2013. Category: Fiction » Adventure » General
A man obsessed with Scotland, a Shamanic Detective and a monk displaced through time must all try to stop a madman from taking over the world. Chasing from London to Africa, Texas to Canada, can our heroes stop him in time to prevent a global financial meltdown? Stock market thugs, Kenyan car races, hallucinogenic trips, the SAS, and a talking moose all pull together to spin an amazing tale!