Darian Wilk

Biography

Freelance writer and author specializing in women's fiction. My current titles include Love Unfinished and Reinventing Claire. The first installment of The Four Peas series, The Responsible One, will be released in June of 2014.

For more information about my books, to sign up for my newsletter, giveaways, or general cyber-stalking, please visit www.DarianWilk.weebly.com

Where to find Darian Wilk online


Where to buy in print


Books

Reinventing Claire
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 85,770. Language: English. Published: April 22, 2014. Category: Fiction » Women's fiction » Chick lit
People get divorced, but that's what happens to other people. That's what Claire thought anyway, until her husband, Charlie, tells her he wants a divorce.
Love Unfinished
By
Price: Free! Words: 72,600. Language: English. Published: October 17, 2011. Category: Fiction » Women's fiction » General
(5.00 from 2 reviews)
Soul mates from the past leave their love unfinished when a tragic car accident ends their lives on their wedding day. Yet they are destined to meet again to fulfill that love in new incarnations, leading vastly different lives. Are they fated to fulfill their love, or will they choose once again, to leave love unfinished?

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Smashwords book reviews by Darian Wilk

  • Maggie Mae on March 02, 2012

    When first reading the synopsis of this book I was intrigued, the idea of fate pulling two people together, people seemingly impossible to fall for loves tricks, well obviously, that’s right up my alley! I was eager to dive into this one, and not at all disappointed once I started reading. Wolters did a superb job showing the emotion, the unexplainable connection between Maggie and Michael. The characters feeling the strange sensations they both feared to ever feel, yet not being able to deny its existence, was very well described. You could sense the rush, confusion, fear and hope in the wave of their meeting. And from there, you couldn’t help rooting for love to triumph fear, and to crush Rafferty’s twisted hopes for his relationship with Maggie. I was so pulled into this story I had to keep turning the pages. Just as I was about to cheer that love would survive, I saw how many pages were left and braced myself for heartache. In one turn after another love was at your fingertips, and then pulled away, then within reach again. It was a thrilling ride Maggie and Michael’s whirlwind relationship took me on. So much so that I finished the book in one day. Yes, neglecting everything I had on the to-do list, I plopped my kids in front of the TV and put a movie on for them – I just had to see how this ended. I could easily connect with these characters, getting wrapped up in their every emotion came easy, and I can’t even quite say why. Which right there, is a sign of solid writing. They were real characters; flawed, broken, hopeful and scared. Much like we all have been at some point in our life. The ending held a few surprises in it, and I won’t indulge you with whether it left me heartbroken, or embracing the excitement of a ‘happily ever after’. I will say however that it held within it many sweet moments. Overall this was an excellent read, and well worth the guilt of making my kids watch TV for an entire afternoon. The way Wolters developed the bond between Maggie and Michael, and the challenges they met to fight or accept love was, well…for anyone who has seen The Notebook, that feeling – you’ll find it in this book. If you’re a fan of love, a fan of getting sucked into the story of people meant to be together – yet almost pulled apart by circumstance, you’ll love this book. Wolters masterfully produced one of the best love stories I have read in a very long time. **Copied from my blog http://crazyladywithapen.blogspot.com/
  • Maggie Mae on March 02, 2012

    When first reading the synopsis of this book I was intrigued, the idea of fate pulling two people together, people seemingly impossible to fall for loves tricks, well obviously, that’s right up my alley! I was eager to dive into this one, and not at all disappointed once I started reading. Wolters did a superb job showing the emotion, the unexplainable connection between Maggie and Michael. The characters feeling the strange sensations they both feared to ever feel, yet not being able to deny its existence, was very well described. You could sense the rush, confusion, fear and hope in the wave of their meeting. And from there, you couldn’t help rooting for love to triumph fear, and to crush Rafferty’s twisted hopes for his relationship with Maggie. I was so pulled into this story I had to keep turning the pages. Just as I was about to cheer that love would survive, I saw how many pages were left and braced myself for heartache. In one turn after another love was at your fingertips, and then pulled away, then within reach again. It was a thrilling ride Maggie and Michael’s whirlwind relationship took me on. So much so that I finished the book in one day. Yes, neglecting everything I had on the to-do list, I plopped my kids in front of the TV and put a movie on for them – I just had to see how this ended. I could easily connect with these characters, getting wrapped up in their every emotion came easy, and I can’t even quite say why. Which right there, is a sign of solid writing. They were real characters; flawed, broken, hopeful and scared. Much like we all have been at some point in our life. The ending held a few surprises in it, and I won’t indulge you with whether it left me heartbroken, or embracing the excitement of a ‘happily ever after’. I will say however that it held within it many sweet moments. Overall this was an excellent read, and well worth the guilt of making my kids watch TV for an entire afternoon. The way Wolters developed the bond between Maggie and Michael, and the challenges they met to fight or accept love was, well…for anyone who has seen The Notebook, that feeling – you’ll find it in this book. If you’re a fan of love, a fan of getting sucked into the story of people meant to be together – yet almost pulled apart by circumstance, you’ll love this book. Wolters masterfully produced one of the best love stories I have read in a very long time. **Copied from my blog, Crazy Lady with a Pen
  • The Beacon Singer on March 24, 2012

    The Beacon Singer is about Jane Lake, a feisty jazz singer who finds herself home again to mend the pieces of her life, and figure out exactly what the heck she’s going to do with it. Mingled throughout this book are the stories of those around her, Philip and his strange connection with young Stella, Ruth and her awkward longing for Simon, to Margaret and her here-then gone husband, Jane’s parents, and Jane’s love/hate relationship with her brother, David. By the synopsis I had expected the book to mostly be about Jane, but it’s far more than that. There’s an abundance of plot here, much like watching a mini-series; you were slipped into not only Jane’s life, but also of all the ones around her in the English Lake District. You’re not very far into the book before you’re met with the scandalicious ways of small town life. Chapman nailed that aspect, how life in these towns can be smiles up front, yet burning your ears with the buzz of gossip. Chapman did a very nice job describing London and the peaceful life of Jane’s quaint hometown, so much so that I felt as if she plucked me right out of America and set me down in this beautiful, exquisite land I have never seen with my own eye. She’s left me with the urge to take a vacation I cannot afford to indulge in the beauty of that land. I did however have a hard time really connecting with the characters. Their struggles and emotions were on the tips of my fingers, but I just couldn’t quite feel them for a good portion of the book. But that’s not to say others would have this problem. Connections felt with characters can vary greatly from reader to reader. Where I felt this slight barrier between me and the characters, another reader may relate with them on the deepest of levels. That being said, I did end up bridging the gap with them better toward the middle of the book, and felt I knew them well by the end. The ending for me was tied up nicely, Chapman did well in addressing any loose ends. And I would have to say the ending seemed fitting for the characters and their journey, I probably would have been disappointed had it ended any other way. Overall this was a decent read! Chapman is a very fine writer, she has wonderful talent with description, a keen eye for plot twists and pace, and I also loved that she kept her chapters short. This makes reading for busy people like me so much easier. I could dive into the story, yet always had a decent place to stop and not feel as if I was leaving in the middle of a great scene. I hate when I have to do that. Chapman, clearly, put a lot of thought and heart into this book, and I applaud her for that. I do wish that I could have connected on a deeper level with the characters earlier on, but a connection was established, leaving my inner reader satisfied in the end! **My review copied from Krazy Book Lady's blog
  • Quarter Life Crisis on July 27, 2012

    Quarter Life Crisis is a great tale of women's relationships, and how they can change over the years. The story develops easy enough, with a little bit of background on the characters as you go. It was well written, flowed nicely, and pulls you into the characters lives. I quite enjoyed the part when the women came together, hoping to fix the rift growing between them, and end up learning so much about themselves and their relationships. Portions of their stories were very emotional, making you truly feel their story. But mixed throughout is plenty of humor, adding even more to the image of real women. When we get together with the girls, we can be crying together one minute, and giggling from our toes the next. Overall this was a well written novel, and surely the first of many great books by Krach. I really enjoyed how easily I could connect with the characters and their lives. They were real women; strong, weak, funny, loving, and flawed. It was nice to read a book realistically depicting women. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a fan of chic lit or women's fiction, and would surely watch out for the next book by Krach. **I received a free copy for review
  • Quarter Life Crisis on July 27, 2012

    Quarter Life Crisis is a great tale of women's relationships, and how they can change over the years. The story develops easy enough, with a little bit of background on the characters as you go. It was well written, flowed nicely, and pulls you into the characters lives. I quite enjoyed the part when the women came together, hoping to fix the rift growing between them, and end up learning so much about themselves and their relationships. Portions of their stories were very emotional, making you truly feel their story. But mixed throughout is plenty of humor, adding even more to the image of real women. When we get together with the girls, we can be crying together one minute, and giggling from our toes the next. Overall this was a well written novel, and surely the first of many great books by Krach. I really enjoyed how easily I could connect with the characters and their lives. They were real women; strong, weak, funny, loving, and flawed. It was nice to read a book realistically depicting women. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a fan of chic lit or women's fiction, and would surely watch out for the next book by Krach. **I received a free copy for review