Dennis E. Rusk

Biography

Architect Dennis E. Rusk is a self-studied, licensed architect practicing principally in the Las Vegas Valley for the past 30 years. Dennis studied for, and then passed, the Nevada Residential Designer Exam, the seven part Architectural Exam which became the NCARB Architectural Equivalency of a degree of Architecture Exam, and the Architect Professional Exam. Dennis also qualified, and obtained, a National Council of Architectural Registrant Boards Certificate. An Architect with this certificate in good standing may apply for licensing by reciprocity in all states that recognize the NCARB, including Canada, Mexico and China. The NCARB also considers an Architect in its member jurisdictions that has ten years experience and passed the NCARB exam as equivalent to an accredited degree of Architecture.

Dennis has designed over 600 projects including custom homes, sub-divisions, apartments, condominiums, multi-use residential, time-share resorts, a city hall and library, a country club, healthcare facilities, churches, retreats, destination resorts, hospitality and entertainment venues, business complexes, restaurants and amusements parks; including rides. Dennis also provided third party reviews and construction control for over 100 projects for US Bank. The adage “the best laid plans of mice and men often go ashtray” is a truism in architecture; not all were built.

Dennis has practiced architecture in the State of Nevada from February 1, 1980 through May 5, 2012.

He is currently engaged in litigation against the Nevada State Board of Architecture, Interior Design and Residential Design.

Where to buy in print


Books

Death of American Architecture
By
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 52,830. Language: English. Published: November 27, 2012 by The von Raesfeld Agency. Category: Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture
American architecture is dying a slow, agonizing death, akin to a disease that eats away at the human spirit. The individualist creative minds in American architecture flourished between the World Wars - Organic, Arts & Crafts, Art Deco. Now the death toll rings monotonously as artistic endeavors of architectural design melt into mediocrity. Greatness is poorly imitated and rarely improved upon.

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