Dolores A McCabe

Biography

Dolores holds two degrees, one in Philosophy and English, another in Applied Music, Piano. Dolores has self-published four novels, NORTHWIND, THE SHADOW OF THE PHOENIX, THE HIGHEST DESTINY. and AXIOS.

Where to find Dolores A McCabe online


Where to buy in print


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Dolores A McCabe

  • The Important Message on July 30, 2011

    What a darling little book to read to very small children. The rhythmic sounds that the animal friends make are just great for engaging toddlers' attention. Highly recommended.
  • The Important Message on July 30, 2011

    What a darling little book to read to very small children. The rhythmic sounds that the animal friends make are just great for engaging toddlers' attention. Highly recommended.
  • Peeper and the Great Hawkins on July 30, 2011

    A very nice introduction into the biblical story of David and Goliath that will catch the attention of very young children. They will make the connection very easily between this brave little baby chicken and themselves.
  • Stealing Mercy on Dec. 13, 2011

    Book Review STEALING MERCY by Kristy Tate' reviewed by Dolores A McCabe STEALING MERCY opens with a gripping hook. Mercy is a talented young baker in Victorian England. She is being stalked by the mysterious and sinister Mr. Steele. He breaks into her apartment, murder his intention, and Mercy strikes him with a poker. Not sure whether he was alive or dead, she fled to America, to Seattle, to be exact, where she has relatives. In a short time she meets Trent Michaels and finds herself very attracted to him. However, Mr. Steele is very much alive and reappears in Seattle with his henchmen and a mysterious interest in Lucky Island, a gambling and prostitution retreat where women simply vanish and are never seen again. Mercy must pursue this mystery and find a lost relative who may be in Mr. Steele's clutches. Will Trent understand and help her? Or will Mr. Steele succeed in "Stealing Mercy?" This story has a lot of promise. There are some delightful characters and some very sinister ones. The author has a gift for drawing them with quick sketches. I had a little difficulty following the action because the settings were a bit too sparse. More background filler about each character would help, also, in seeing how everyone fits into each others' lives. Notwithstanding, STEALING MERCY is a fast read and an enjoyable one. We hope to see more from this author as she develops her craft.
  • Stealing Mercy on Dec. 13, 2011

    Book Review STEALING MERCY by Kristy Tate' reviewed by Dolores A McCabe STEALING MERCY opens with a gripping hook. Mercy is a talented young baker in Victorian England. She is being stalked by the mysterious and sinister Mr. Steele. He breaks into her apartment, murder his intention, and Mercy strikes him with a poker. Not sure whether he was alive or dead, she fled to America, to Seattle, to be exact, where she has relatives. In a short time she meets Trent Michaels and finds herself very attracted to him. However, Mr. Steele is very much alive and reappears in Seattle with his henchmen and a mysterious interest in Lucky Island, a gambling and prostitution retreat where women simply vanish and are never seen again. Mercy must pursue this mystery and find a lost relative who may be in Mr. Steele's clutches. Will Trent understand and help her? Or will Mr. Steele succeed in "Stealing Mercy?" This story has a lot of promise. There are some delightful characters and some very sinister ones. The author has a gift for drawing them with quick sketches. I had a little difficulty following the action because the settings were a bit too sparse. More background filler about each character would help, also, in seeing how everyone fits into each others' lives. Notwithstanding, STEALING MERCY is a fast read and an enjoyable one. We hope to see more from this author as she develops her craft.
  • The Way of Beauty – Meidao on July 05, 2012

    This was a deep dive into meditation literature. Ms. Roovers delicately blends Japanese and Chinese mysticism in a seamless blend of thought leading to tranquility. There was a mixture of text and charts which added to the interest. Ms. Roovers demonstates a high level of proficiency in her topic. I would urge the author to create an introduction to this work for readers who are not fluent with this type of mysticism.
  • Great-Grandpa Fussy and the Little Puckerdoodles on July 05, 2012

    What a delightful story! I loved the generational inclusion and the warmth of the family ties that are the foundation for this endearing story. Yukiko Mishima's illustrations are masterful and engaging and add delth to the story. Highly recommended!
  • Carrier-of-Bones on July 05, 2012

    This book has depth and reliable research behind it. Carrier-of-Bones is the name the Indians give to Jean-Claude, who embarks upon a grueling and hazardous journey to Acadia to honor the wishes of his deceased mother that she and her daughter be interred in the family plot. The setting is shortly after the French and Indian War, a terrifying epoch in AMerican history when settlers were taking over tribal lands and the Indians were retaliating. Jean-Claude loses his father to consumption and bravelyh continues the journey until he arrives at his destination. This compelling tale takes an unflinching look at frontier life and the interests that formed their bloody rivalry for America.
  • Brian: A New Beginning on July 05, 2012

    Brian is a lonely little Russian child who is trying to adapt to life in America. The author treats Brian's story with love and compassion. This is an interesting story for anyone trying to understand the first generation immigrant experience,
  • Death's Promise on July 05, 2012

    This is a paranormal tale of a girl's frightening and yet exicting visitation by Orin and Jett, two denizens of a world outside of reality. I liked it and as a YA novel I think it is fulfilling in plot, character and structure.
  • The Three Little Swine: A Revisionist History on July 06, 2012

    Very imaginative retelling of the Three Little Pigs. One thing in common: the pigs were pretty stupid in both renditions! I am reminded of Orwell and as an adult I perceived the hidden agenda. I am not sure children will understand the author's intent, and I think they will still prefer the original version.